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I spent several hours crafting an SQL query that executes a JOIN and sorts two columns together, in a way that I haven't dealt with before. Here is the query:

SELECT `m`.`id`, `m`.`primary_category_id`, `m`.`primary_category_priority`, `m`.`description`
FROM (`merchant` AS m)
LEFT JOIN `merchant_category`
    ON `merchant_category`.`merchant_id` = `m`.`id`
WHERE
    `merchant_category`.`category_id` = '2'
    OR `m`.`primary_category_id` = '2'
GROUP BY `m`.`id`
ORDER BY
    LEAST(merchant_category.priority = 0, `primary_category_priority` = 0) ASC,
    LEAST(merchant_category.priority, `primary_category_priority` ) ASC
LIMIT 10

It has to sort two columns together, one from the merchant_category table, and one from the merchant table, so that they're sorted together. Each row of the merchant has a a "primary" category, referred to directly in the table, and zero or more "secondary" categories, stored in the merchant_category table. Now it works fine, but it's very slow: usually over a minute on my production database. I imagine the JOIN plus the complex sorting is causing the problem, but what can I do?

EDIT Here are the two table's schemas:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `merchant` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(100) CHARACTER SET utf8 NOT NULL,
  `primary_category_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `primary_category_priority` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `description` mediumtext CHARACTER SET utf8 NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `merchant_category` (
  `id` int(10) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `merchant_id` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `category_id` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `priority` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
)
share|improve this question
    
can you post the schema of tables specifically merchant and merchant_category? maybe you have missed some indexes.. –  John Woo Sep 18 '12 at 0:55
    
Do you have indexes set-up properly? How many rows in the two tables ? –  Erik Sep 18 '12 at 0:55
    
@Erik merchant has over 20,000 I believe, and merchant_category has several times more. –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 1:09
    
@JohnWoo I added the table schemas. –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 1:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try to add foreign key constraint on the second table,

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `merchant_category` (
  `id` int(10) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `merchant_id` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `category_id` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `priority` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT mc_fk FOREIGN KEY (`merchant_id`) REFERENCES `merchant`(`id`)
)
share|improve this answer
    
@Jonah what are you trying to sort? –  John Woo Sep 18 '12 at 1:23
    
By a priority number that is in two different tables. In the merchant table for the primary category, and in the merchant_category table for the secondary categories. –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 15:29
    
Okay, I added the foreign key constraint, should I expect my query to run more quickly now? –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 16:05
    
as expected, maybe. did you try to run the query again? –  John Woo Sep 18 '12 at 16:06
    
wow, that sped it up so much, it's basically instant now. Thanks! –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 19:20

You're forcing it to run LEAST (twice!) for each row in order to sort it. It can't use an index for this.

share|improve this answer
    
What would you recommend as an alternative? –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 1:03
    
I had to use LEAST to integrate the two numbers, in order to sort them together. –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 1:14
    
Two other small comments. Shouldn't the 'merchant_category.category_id = '2'' be part of the JOIN? And You should have a composite index that includes the things you're selecting by and the primary key, so (primary_category_id, id). An EXPLAIN would have shown a table scan on that table... –  Alain Collins Sep 18 '12 at 1:16
    
I don't know if it would be any faster, but it feels like you should use a CASE statement as part of the SELECT to determine the priority, and then SORT BY that named column. –  Alain Collins Sep 18 '12 at 1:21
    
that WHERE statement is just the particular category being selected in this case, it could be anything. –  Jonah Sep 18 '12 at 15:28

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