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My codes are as simple as these:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
//Some codes here...
bool somefunction(){
    cout<<"单元格";
    return false;
}

and this is what I got:

error C2143: syntax error: missing ';' before 'return';
error C2001: newline is constant;

Moreover, if i change "单元格" into an English version like "cell", it works perfectly;

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I think your compiler just doesn't understand what encoding your source file is in. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 18 '12 at 1:03
1  
What are you expecting to happen exactly? Are you expecting a multibyte string? Or are you expecting the compiler to output a UTF-8 string? –  David Schwartz Sep 18 '12 at 1:04
2  
Try std::wcout instead –  StoryTeller Sep 18 '12 at 1:04

3 Answers 3

The compiler errors indicate that your compiler doesn't support Unicode characters in source code. You'll have to escape them, use wide-character constants, and wcout:

wcout << L"\x5355\x5143\x683c";

If you need to output characters in a specific encoding (e.g. gb2312), use that encoding in the string literal:

cout << "\xb5\xa5\xd4\xaa\xb8\xf1"; // string encoded with GB2312
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To work with non-english character sets you should use std::wcout to print wide-characters, like so

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
//Some codes here...
bool somefunction(){
  wcout<< L"单元格";
  return false;
}

And be sure not to mix both cout and wcout in the same program.

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Wait, it's "using namespace", not just "namespace", right? –  Ray Toal Sep 18 '12 at 1:09
    
Yes. Thanks for pointing it out :) –  StoryTeller Sep 18 '12 at 1:10
    
I would have edited it myself but thought, well......... C++ 11 maybe? –  Ray Toal Sep 18 '12 at 1:12
    
Not as far as I'm aware of :) Just the time of night at this part of the globe.. hehe –  StoryTeller Sep 18 '12 at 1:13
1  
It does not really matter if you use cout or wcout in this case. The code is failing to compile as the compiler is choking on that string as written (i.e. in the given character set) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 18 '12 at 1:34

Use wcout and Unicode literals (L"单元格"). This good practice even if you're only dealing with English characters. Also use wstring.

Edit: Actually another problem may be that you're storing the file in a non-Unicode encoding, so the characters are lost. Tell your editor to store the file as Unicode.

Another problem may be that the console (or wcout) doesn't display Unicode characters correctly. If you display them in a message box (with MessageBoxW) they are displayed correctly.

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Wide character strings (L"") are not necessarily Unicode. Depends on the OS, the compiler etc. –  André Caron Sep 18 '12 at 1:15

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