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I have problems when certain functions in my code are executed in quick succession. I thought maybe a few lines of javascript would prevent trigger-happy folks.

So here's what I hoped to use.

   function change(){
   if(mod == 1 || mod == null){
   var mod=2;
   //function goes here    
   window.setTimeout(function(){var mod=1;}, 500);
   }

Is there a way to do this that actually works?

I also feel there should be a more global approach to this I'm not thinking of.

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I have no idea what you're actually trying to do... but as per your title it sounds like you're looking for "callbacks" –  Jeremy Sep 18 '12 at 1:14
    
essentially disable the function until a period of time has passed... –  hooligans Sep 18 '12 at 1:16
    
If you store the handle of the timeout and then call window.clearTimeout(handle), I think that will give you the behavior you're looking for since the timeout be reset on each successive call. –  TMan Sep 18 '12 at 1:18
    
Ah. That seems much more streamlined than what I was doing. –  hooligans Sep 18 '12 at 1:47
    
I'm assuming you're checking against the mod variable and using a setTimeout to reset it? If so you only need to remove the var from the inner function used in the setTimeout. It's creating another variable called mod that has nothing to do with the outer mod. –  slebetman Sep 18 '12 at 3:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can throttle or debounce the callback. There's a nice (jQuery-optional) library that wraps all this up for you: jQuery throttle/debounce.

jQuery throttle / debounce allows you to rate-limit your functions in multiple useful ways. Passing a delay and callback to $.throttle returns a new function that will execute no more than once every delay milliseconds. Passing a delay and callback to $.debounce returns a new function that will execute only once, coalescing multiple sequential calls into a single execution at either the very beginning or end.

Since you just commented that you want to

disable the function until a period of time has passed

it sounds like you're looking for the debounce use-case.

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This seems like what I'm looking for... The debounce code seems to be an embellished elapsed-time function though. Not sure I can't use something better on a much smaller scale, but it's certainly worth it globally. –  hooligans Sep 18 '12 at 1:29

Your solution almost works. Your problem is you're not creating a closure for mod but instead create another variable called mod in the setTimeout. This should work:

   function change(){
     if(mod == 1 || mod == null){
       var mod=2;
       //function goes here    
       window.setTimeout(function(){mod=1;}, 500);
     }
   }
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