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Code:

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
  onload = function(){
    document.getElementById('btn1').onclick = function(){   
      if (window === window)  
        alert('window === window')
      else
        alert('window !== window');

      if (window.event === window.event)  
        alert('window.event === window.event')
      else
        alert('window.event !== window.event' );   
    }
  }
</script>
</head>
<body>
<button id="btn1" >click</button>
</body>
</html>

Result:

IE(i have tested IE6 - IE8) says:

window === window
window.event !== window.event

All other browsers say:

window === window
window.event === window.event

What's the reason for IE's response? Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
Maybe it's NaN? Or a race condition? Is this repeatable? Console dot log the value of window.event a few times. :) –  Ray Toal Sep 18 '12 at 2:00
    
Note that in (at least some) non-IE browsers window.event would likely be undefined. And undefined===undefined is true. –  nnnnnn Sep 18 '12 at 2:52
add comment

3 Answers 3

I did some experimenting. It looks like every time you access window.event in IE, you get a new object:

document.body.onclick = function() {
    var u = window.event, v = window.event;
    console.log(window.event == window.event); // false
    console.log(u == v); // false
    console.log(u == u); // true
    console.log(v == v); // true
    console.log(u == window.event); // false
    console.log(v == window.event); // false
};

So whenever you retrieve window.event, IE creates a new object. If you test that object against itself (u == u or v == v) it is true. If you test it against another window.event object, it's false.

(Note that this is different behavior from NaN, as var a = NaN; console.log(a == a); is false.)

Think of window.event as something like a generator, more like window.createCopyOfLastEvent() in IE. window.event is a getter which always returns a new object. The following illustrates this point:

document.body.onclick = function() {
    var v = window.event;
    v.a = 1;
    console.log(v.a); // 1
    console.log(window.event.a); // undefined
};

In the above example, window.event.a is undefined when it is logged because it refers to a different object, than the one where a = 1.

To further illustrate, this behavior could be recreated in pure JavaScript (in a ES5 supported browser: IE9, or latest versions of FF, Chrome, or Safari):

var weirdObject = Object.create({ }, {
    whoa: {
        get: function() {
            return new Object();
        }
    }
});

console.log(weirdObject.whoa == weirdObject.whoa); // false

Or maybe even stranger looking:

Object.defineProperty(window, 'ahh', {
    get: function() {
        return Math.random();
    }
});

console.log(ahh == ahh); // false
share|improve this answer
    
it seems the reason and that experiment discovers how IE works on this issue. –  iacnats Sep 18 '12 at 4:30
    
That is some great detective work there. Too bad I only have one upvote for you. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 18 '12 at 4:53
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Update: Read this: IE Bug (window === top) === false

In short -- IE is broken and doesn't compare host objects well.

Not all browsers support window.event. Most use an event object passed to the function. (window.event was considered an IE specific thing, though it appears that Chrome has copied it.)

Try this:

 document.getElementById('btn1').onclick = function(event){   
  if (!event) {event = window.event;}

  alert([typeof event, typeof window.event])

  if (window === window)  
    alert('window === window')
  else
    alert('window !== window');

  if (window.event === window.event)  
    alert('window.event === window.event')
  else
    alert('window.event !== window.event' );   
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Chrome does: jsfiddle.net/C78MN/1 –  Blender Sep 18 '12 at 2:27
    
Ah, thanks @Blender -- I keep forgetting about Chrome doing that. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 18 '12 at 2:30
    
This doesn't explain why window.event is not equal to window.event. –  Nathan Wall Sep 18 '12 at 2:34
    
@NathanWall -- Found a discussion that explains more. Updated my answer. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 18 '12 at 2:39
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The comparison behaviour is ECMAScript-compliant When the code is executed in a browser that does not support window.event, we're effectively comparing two undefined values which returns true. On MSIE window.event is merely a MSEventObj interface, meaning that two different calls to it will not return the same object, and they will compare falsely.

That means that, well, window.event will never be the same so the comparison is pointless. If you're trying to compare event types, you can do duck type comparison by forcing string comparison:

//false, you're either comparing undefined values or different objects
console.log(window.event == window.event);

//true, you're either comparing two "undefined" or "[object MSEventObj]" strings
console.log((""+window.event) === (""+window.event));

I'm not aware of a practical scenario where you would be required to perform this particular check. Determining the event type should be done by checking its type property:

function doSomething(e) {
  if (!e) var e = window.event;
  alert(e.type);//or whatever
}

Note that this should be executed from a script that's part of DOM - not from developer tools' console:

don't

Overview of cross-browser event properties' quirks

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but it would seem that the MSIE event model is not consistent with the W3C Events spec which talks about event objects propagating through the document. So a reference to an event object at any particular current event target should be the same object as the event object at any other current event target in any phase. –  RobG Feb 1 '13 at 2:33
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