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I have the following code:

    $.ajax({
        url: href,
        dataType: 'json',
        type: 'POST',
        data: $form.serializeArray()
        })
        .done(onDone)
        .fail(onFail);

Here's the onDone function:

var onDone = function (json, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
    json = json || {};
    if (json.Success) {
        submitSuccessModal(json);
  • Can someone tell me if these are the correct arguments for the onDone function. also how does the $.ajax call know how to populate these?

  • Also what's this code doing: json = json || {};

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2 Answers 2

The .done event should have a function to handle the response.

For example:

.done(function(return){
  //do something here where return is the result of the AJAX call
})

What I do is just place the function in my done, success, etc... like above.

The code json = json || {}; means to set the variable to the JSON return or to an empty object. This is preferred to using the New Keyword.

This could be like:

.done(function(json){
    json = json || {};
    If(json.Success){
      submitSuccessModal(json);
    }
})
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But what parameters should I use for the .done event? My team mates are using the ones in my question. Are all those populated and how come you don't use them? –  Anne Sep 18 '12 at 3:22
    
Thanks for the explanation about the json = line. But what happens if its not there? Can I just remove it? Do you use the same in your code? –  Anne Sep 18 '12 at 3:24
    
What it does is ensure you JavaScript does not crash if no return is given from the server. If you remove it, then any problem on the server that does not give a return will kill your JavaScript until a user refreshes a page. I would keep it in. –  Todd Moses Sep 18 '12 at 3:28
    
Todd, if the return from the server isn't valid JSON won't jQuery call the .fail() handler rather than .done()? –  nnnnnn Sep 18 '12 at 3:54
    
I do not think fail() would be called. Done would get called when a response back is given. I think fail() would only be called if done was replaced with success() now that I think about it. I was just thinking of some scenario I had where the return JSON was not an object due to server code. –  Todd Moses Sep 18 '12 at 3:58

"Can someone tell me if these are the correct arguments for the onDone function. also how does the $.ajax call know how to populate these?"

Those are the correct arguments. But $.ajax() doesn't know or care what arguments you've declared in your function - regardless of what you've declared your function will be called with three arguments: "the data returned from the server, formatted according to the dataType parameter; a string describing the status; and the jqXHR (in jQuery 1.4.x, XMLHttpRequest) object." The actual argument names don't matter, it is the order that matters. You can ignore the ones that you don't need to use; most times you'll only need the first, the actual data.

In a general sense, JavaScript functions can be called with any number of arguments regardless of how many were declared, so you can just declare the first argument if it is the only one you're using. Or you can declare no arguments and still access what is passed via the arguments object.

"Also what's this code doing: json = json || {};`"

The || operator returns the first truthy operand. In this case it is shorthand to say that if json is not already an object then assign it to an empty object. In the context of an Ajax callback I don't think you need this test because jQuery shouldn't call your .done() function unless the response was successfully parsed as valid JSON.

(Note also that the json argument won't actually receive JSON, it will receive an object. Under the covers jQuery receives JSON, but it parses it and passes the result to your function.)

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