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I have 2 files namely

**a.txt**
cars
bikes
bus 
vehicle
atv

**b.txt**
hawk
hero
atv
bus

***result.txt***
cars
bikes
vehicle
hawk
hero

I want to print the difference between the 2 files. Now I have tried a code but it gives me the difference in a random manner; I want it to display it in a proper sequential manner. Can anyone help me out in this.

use strict;
my %results = ();  

open FILE1, "<a.txt"
    or die "Could not open file: $! \n"; 
while (my $line = <FILE1>) {

    $results{$line}=1; 
} 
close FILE1;  

open FILE2, "<b.txt" 
    or die "Could not open file: $! \n"; 
while (my $line = <FILE2>) {

    $results{$line}++; 
} 
close FILE2;

open OUTFILE, ">>result.txt" 
    or die "Cannot open $outfile for writing \n";
foreach my $line (keys %results) { 

    print OUTFILE $line if $results{$line} == 1; 
} 

close OUTFILE; 
close OUTFILE1;

The output that I am getting with this code is

***result.txt***
cars
hawk
bikes
hero
vehicle
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Hashes store their elements in a random order, therefore we have to carry positional information with us. In the following solution, I use the hash value to carry an unique ID.

Code

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper;

my @a = qw( cars bikes bus vehicle atv );
my @b = qw( hawk hero atv bus );

my $i = 0;
my %ahash = map {$_ => ++$i} @a;
my %bhash = map {$_ => ++$i} @b;

my %different = map {
  ($ahash{$_} and $bhash{$_})
    ? ()
    : ($_ => ($ahash{$_} or $bhash{$_}))
} (keys %ahash, keys %bhash);

my @sorted = sort {$different{$a} <=> $different{$b}} keys %different;

print Dumper(\@sorted);

Discussion

For the purpose of demonstration, I didn't use files, but stored the records in arrays @a and @b.

I build hashes %ahash and %bhash from these arrays, using the array element as key and using an unique number as value. In the case of the %ahash, these IDs are the same as the line number. You can think of the IDs in %bhash as line numbers with an offset.

I then gather all key-value pairs that differ between the hashes. To do that, I take the list of all keys in %ahash and %bhash. For each of these keys, I test for the existence of this key in both hashes (I don't use exists, but rather test against the value, as I can guarantee that no ID with a false value is assigned—all numbers except 0 evaluate true). If the key exists in both hashes, I return the empty list (). If the key exists in only one of the hashes, I return a two-element list containing the key and the value, which is either in %ahash or %bhash.

In the next step, I sort all different keys in ascending order by their associated value, and store the keys in this order in @sorted. You would print them to a file, I simply dumped them, and got this output:

$VAR1 = [
      'cars',
      'bikes',
      'vehicle',
      'hawk',
      'hero'
    ];

I believe this meets your criteria.

Basically, you had a quite elegant algorithm to find differences, but you didn't incorporate the sorting data, as I did with my line-number like IDs.

Style notes

In most cases, using lexical filehandles with my is preferred over using global filehandles. Also, the three-argument form of open is more flexible and worth getting used to. For example, I'd write your third line as

my $filename1 = "a.txt";
open my $file1, '<', $filename1 or die qq{Could not open "$filename1": $!\n};

but then again, TIM TOWTDI.

share|improve this answer
    
the output that I am getting with this code is Result.txt cars bikes bus vehicle atv hawk hero atv bus –  chinmoy khaund Sep 18 '12 at 5:53
    
can you please point me out the bug in the code –  chinmoy khaund Sep 18 '12 at 5:56
1  
@chinmoykhaund There is no bug I know of; my code gives the exact output I posted (using perl 12.4 on Ubuntu). The list cars bikes bus vehicle atv hawk hero atv bus is simpy the two input files joined together. I cannot debug your code without seeing it. –  amon Sep 18 '12 at 6:13
    
use strict; use warnings; use Data::Dumper; open f1,"<a.txt"; open f2,"<b.txt"; my @a = <f1>; my @b = <f2>; my $i = 0; my %ahash = map {$_ => ++$i} @a; my %bhash = map {$_ => ++$i} @b; my %different = map { ($ahash{$_} and $bhash{$_}) ? () : ($_ => ($ahash{$_} or $bhash{$_})) } (keys %ahash, keys %bhash); my @sorted = sort {$different{$a} <=> $different{$b}} keys %different; print Dumper(\@sorted); This is the code which I am trying but the result which I am getting is that it is showing just a combined result of both the input files –  chinmoy khaund Sep 18 '12 at 7:09
    
,i have given the code that which I am using,can you please go through it once –  chinmoy khaund Sep 18 '12 at 7:13
perl -lne '$X{$_}++;if(eof){$a++;}if($a==2){foreach (keys %X){if($X{$_}==1){print $_}}}' file1 file2

tested below:

> cat temp
cars
bikes
bus
vehicle
atv
> cat temp2
hawk
hero
atv
bus
> perl -lne '$X{$_}++;if(eof){$a++;}if($a==2){foreach (keys %X){if($X{$_}==1){print $_}}}' temp temp2
cars
hawk
hero
vehicle
bikes
>
share|improve this answer
    
,The out that i need should be like if there is any data in temp.txt which is not in temp2.txt should be printed first and the data which is in temp2.txt and not in temp.txt should append alongwith the previous result.For eg th output should be--cars,bikes,vehicle,hawk,hero –  chinmoy khaund Sep 18 '12 at 7:34
    
@chinmoy.you said "difference between the 2 files".the command prints the same thing.except that the order is different.the output is same as you have mentioned but not the order.please change your question that you want in the same order. –  Vijay Sep 20 '12 at 5:13

Since the data is stored as a hash reference the order is not preserved. See How can I print a Perl hash in specific order?

share|improve this answer
$ diff a.txt b.txt

$ is not part of the code, it is there to denote a bash command prompt.

comm may also be of use to you.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot @protist –  chinmoy khaund Sep 21 '12 at 0:34

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