Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
private String gg;
public void setgg(String gg) 
  {
   this.gg = gg; 
  } 
public String getgg()
  {
    return gg;
  }

Considering the above code, setter and getters are use to act on the private members of a class.

question1. If setter takes one more parameter it will not be a setter I guess ?

question2. How they are different for normal public member functions setting the values of private data members ?

I know we can implement validation in setters to for reusable code and throw exceptions but still not able to understand the real purpose

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

question1. If setter takes one more parameter it will not be a setter I guess ?

It would be setting the value, But it wouldn't be the standard setter method that many framework is looking for to set the value

question2. How they are different for normal public member functions setting the values of private data members ?

They are normal public member methods with standard naming convention


See

share|improve this answer

Getters and setters are simply an object oriented convention. A lot of frameworks will look for methods called "getX()" and "setX(type)"

They're no different from any other method, but adding or removing anything from the method header will break the convention.

share|improve this answer

Firstly your getter setter implementation is wrong by convention. It should be setGg and getGg.

To answers your questions.

  1. Getter setter methods have become a standard way of injecting values to objects and are followed by many frameworks. So you need to follow naming convention as pointed out before.

  2. As long as its accepting the same parameter and and setting the values its the same. But if you do not follow naming convention then most frameworks wont be able to inject values to the objects.

share|improve this answer
    
what if my variable name is 'Method' setMethod(type) will be ok then ? –  114 100 웃 Sep 19 '12 at 18:00
1  
By camel casing convention we dont start a variable name with Upper Case. Follow convention it makes life easier for you and one who maintains your code. To answer your question it will be 'setMethod'. –  Subir Kumar Sao Sep 20 '12 at 4:40

Getters and setters have taked root as a de facto standard in the Java world for encapsulation: the idea that an object hides its internal implementation from associating classes. This is an overall principal of object-oriented programming.

Consider the following class as an example:

// boilerplate

public class A {
    public String b;
}

This is a perfectly valid Java class, with a single field. If another class wishes to read the B property of A, all it needs to is:

A a;
String val = a.b;

and for writes:

a.b = val;

The problem here is that A no longer controls writes to its internal state. Suppose we learned that b has a maximum length of 1024 characters. Every instance of a write to b must now be updated to accomodate the new requirement. Depending on the size of your code base, this can be very expensive.

Alternatively, suppose we had used the getter and setter convention to encapsulate b:

// boilerplate

public class A {
    private String b;

    public void setB(String val) {
        this.b = val;
    }

    public String getB() {
        return this.b;
    }
}

Now reads look like:

A a;
String val = a.getB();

and writes:

a.setB(val);

This takes longer to write in the short term, but an across the board change is much easier to integrate, simply by changing the setter.

Encapsulation is so highly regarded that, as many other commenters have pointed out, many Java frameworks expect this.

share|improve this answer

As others have explained the purpose of getters and setters. i would like to point out that the syntax in your code snippet is not appropriate by java bean standard.

private String value;
public void setValue(String value) {
   this.value=value;
 }
 public String getValue() {
   return value;
 }

for boolean

private boolean val;

public void setVal(boolean val) {
  this.val= val;
 }
 public boolean isVal() {
  return val;
  }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.