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i have the following code :

$(document).ready(function () {
    for (i = 1; i <= number_of_banners; i++) {
    var selector = "#link_" + i;
    $(selector).click(function () {
        alert(i);
        });
    }
});

but the alert() can't get the "i" variable from the for loop. How can I use the i variable of for loop inside the .click function ?

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A classical one:) I guess this has been asked a dozen times on SO. –  Christoph Sep 18 '12 at 6:05
1  
The problem you're having is that the .click() handlers are using the i variable from the for loop - but all of them are referencing the same, live i variable and by the time clicks occur the for loop has completed and i is equal to number_of_banners. (Only a dozen @Christoph? Probably at least a dozen this month...) –  nnnnnn Sep 18 '12 at 6:07
    
possible duplicate of Assign click handlers in for loop –  givanse Feb 10 at 22:14
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can use this code :

$(document).ready(function () {
    for (var i = 1; i <= number_of_banners; i++) {
        var selector = "#link_" + i;
        $(selector).on('click', {id: i}, function (e) {
            alert(e.data.id);
        });
    }
});

you should use on method and use click argument in it instead of using onclick method

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I think you can pass it as a parameter into the anonymous function as long as the function is declared within a scope that can access i.

function (i) {
   alert(i);
}
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That won't work: that function is a callback for the click handler, and jQuery doesn't know to pass that i value in when it calls the function. –  nnnnnn Sep 18 '12 at 6:06
    
@nnn it may work if he puts the func around the handler binding and not inside. –  Christoph Sep 18 '12 at 6:48
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a quick solution would be to use the eventData and store the current i in that:

$(document).ready(function () {
    for (var i = 1; i <= number_of_banners; i++) {
        var selector = "#link_" + i;
        $(selector).bind('click', i, function (e) {
            alert(e.data);
        });
    }
});

if you are using jquery 1.7+ then use on instead of bind

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You can also assign a class to your banners and bind the listener to the class! I love jQuery! :D –  nmenego Sep 18 '12 at 5:38
    
@nmenego yeah, but the author has ids. –  voigtan Sep 18 '12 at 5:40
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Using jQuery .on(event, data, handler) you can do it easily.

$(document).ready(function () {
    for (var i = 1; i <= number_of_banners; i++) {
        var selector = "#link_" + i;
        $(selector).on('click', {id: i}, function (e) {
            alert(e.data.id);
        });
    }
});

Working sample

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+1 nice and clean –  Christoph Sep 18 '12 at 8:18
    
@Christoph thanks, mate. –  thecodeparadox Sep 18 '12 at 8:41
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Might this happen be due the fact of the JavaScript hoisting JavaScript Scoping mechanism??

For instance:

doesn't work as JavaScript uses function scope rather than block scope as we're usually accustomed from other languages like Java and C#. In order to make it work, one has to create a new scope by explicitly creating a new anonymous function which then binds the according variable:

I know this doesn't directly answer the question above, but might still be useful though for others stumbling over this question.

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1  
It's not a hoisting issue, and the scoping issues discussed in the article you link to don't really cover it either. It's more a closure issue (noting though that i is global in the question), and your second fiddle illustrates one way to get it to work - why don't you update your answer to talk about why it works? –  nnnnnn Sep 18 '12 at 6:12
    
@nnnnnn Uhps, sorry, you're right. As I just quickly posted this answer I wrongly added the hoisting stuff, which of course is more a scoping problem (due to the JavaScript function rather than block scope) as you correctly mentioned. I'll update my answer –  Juri Sep 18 '12 at 21:49
    
+1 for the second example of variable binding...... Though an answer that mentions hoisting shouldn't have var statements anywhere but on the first line of a function ;) –  Peter Ajtai Oct 24 '12 at 6:24
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