Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I run facorial function using ECL and newlisp.

ECL:

>(defun fac (n) (if (= n 1) 1 (* n (fac (- n 1)))))
>(fac 20)
22432902008176640000
>(fac 30)
2265252859812191058636308480000000
>(fac 40)
815915283247897734345611269596115894272000000000
...

newlisp

>(define (fac n) (if (= n 1) 1 (* n (fac (- n 1)))))
>(fac 20)
22432902008176640000
>(fac 30)
-8764578968847253504

Why does newlisp return different result with ecl ?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

newLISP is designed to be small (~260K), and one of the things you won't get by default is support for really big integers, and the necessary automatic conversion between ordinary-sized and big integers. If you regularly need integers such as 1000! in your work, then you've probably chosen the wrong language. However, if you want to use newLISP for other reasons, and really really need to calculate 100!, then install the GMP library, and write your code as follows:

(load "gmp.lsp")
(define (factorial-gmp num)
 (if (= num 0)
  "1"
  (GMP:* (string num) (factorial-gmp (- num 1)))))
share|improve this answer

Largest 64-bit integer in newLISP is 9,223,372,036,854,775,807.

share|improve this answer

try floating point:

(define (fac n) (if (= n 1) 1 (mul n (fac (sub n 1)))))

(fac 20) => 2.432902008e+18
share|improve this answer
    
(fac 100) => 9.332621544e+157, that's great ! However, newlisp cannot calculate (fac 1000) but ECL does ! –  z_axis Sep 19 '12 at 0:53
    
BTW, why the + - * / isnot polymorphic as CL does ? –  z_axis Sep 23 '12 at 6:24
    
The manual tells you how to define these operators so that they work with imprecise FP numbers as well as precise integers... :) –  cormullion Sep 23 '12 at 14:31

Since version 10.4.8 newLISP has built-in support (bigint) for unlimited precision integers. This makes the GNU GMP module gmp.lsp obsolete. But due to the way bigint works, you'll see a totally different factorial function than the typical recursive one:

(define (fac n) (apply * (map bigint (sequence 1 n)) 2))
(fac 1000)

> 
(lambda (n) (apply * (map bigint (sequence 1 n)) 2))
402387260077093773543702433923003985719374864210714632543799910429938512398629020592044208486969404800479988610197196058631666872994808558901323829669944590997424504087073759918823627727188732519779505950995276120874975462497043601418278094646496291056393887437886487337119181045825783647849977012476632889835955735432513185323958463075557409114262417474349347553428646576611667797396668820291207379143853719588249808126867838374559731746136085379534524221586593201928090878297308431392844403281231558611036976801357304216168747609675871348312025478589320767169132448426236131412508780208000261683151027341827977704784635868170164365024153691398281264810213092761244896359928705114964975419909342221566832572080821333186116811553615836546984046708975602900950537616475847728421889679646244945160765353408198901385442487984959953319101723355556602139450399736280750137837615307127761926849034352625200015888535147331611702103968175921510907788019393178114194545257223865541461062892187960223838971476088506276862967146674697562911234082439208160153780889893964518263243671616762179168909779911903754031274622289988005195444414282012187361745992642956581746628302955570299024324153181617210465832036786906117260158783520751516284225540265170483304226143974286933061690897968482590125458327168226458066526769958652682272807075781391858178889652208164348344825993266043367660176999612831860788386150279465955131156552036093988180612138558600301435694527224206344631797460594682573103790084024432438465657245014402821885252470935190620929023136493273497565513958720559654228749774011413346962715422845862377387538230483865688976461927383814900140767310446640259899490222221765904339901886018566526485061799702356193897017860040811889729918311021171229845901641921068884387121855646124960798722908519296819372388642614839657382291123125024186649353143970137428531926649875337218940694281434118520158014123344828015051399694290153483077644569099073152433278288269864602789864321139083506217095002597389863554277196742822248757586765752344220207573630569498825087968928162753848863396909959826280956121450994871701244516461260379029309120889086942028510640182154399457156805941872748998094254742173582401063677404595741785160829230135358081840096996372524230560855903700624271243416909004153690105933983835777939410970027753472000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000L
share|improve this answer

Since version 10.4.8 newLISP has built-in support (bigint) for unlimited precision integers.

bigint recursive factorial:

> (define (fac n) (if (= n 1) 1 (* (bigint n) (fac (- n 1)))))
> (fac 20)
2432902008176640000L
> (fac 30)
265252859812191058636308480000000L
> (fac 40)
815915283247897734345611269596115894272000000000L
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.