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Say I have a class and a function:

class AddressValidator(self):
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def validate(address):
        # ...

def validate_address(addr):
    validator = AddressValidator()
    return validator.validate(addr)

The function is a shortcut for using the class, if you will. Now, what if this function has to be run thousands of times? If the validator class actually has to do something on instantiation, like connecting to a database, creating it over and over thousands of times is pretty wasteful. I was wondering if I could perhaps do something like this:

def validate_address(addr):
    if not hasattr(validate_address, 'validator'):
        validate_address.validator = AddressValidator()

    validator = validate_address.validator
    return validator.validate(addr)

Now the validator class is only instantiated once and saved "in the function", to put it that way. I've never seen this done though, so I'm guessing it's bad practice. If so, why?

Note: I know I can just cache the validator object in a module global. I'm just curious if this is a viable solution when I want to avoid littering my module.

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It's not a bad practice. Functions are objects after all. It's just that there are better solutions for your problem. Just like you said: storing AddressValidator in global scope. Or creating a singleton. Or passing it as an argument. It depends on your actual use. –  freakish Sep 18 '12 at 5:51
    
where is the difference between adding a function and having an instance arround you use for that? Both take one name. See Odomontois answer for a solution how it gets a little nicer –  ted Sep 18 '12 at 6:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Despite "everithing is an object", not everithing work as nice as instances of well controlled class. This problem looks like typical case for "functor" or "callable object" as it called in python.

the code will be look something like

class AddressValidator(self):
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def __call__(self,address):
        # ...

validate_address = AdressValidator()

or you could just define your function as shortcut to bound method

class AddressValidator(self):
    def __init__(self):
        pass
    def validate(self,address):
        # ...

validate_adress = AdressValidator().validate
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1  
You'd need a @staticmethod above the definition of validate in your second example. –  Jake Sep 18 '12 at 6:33
    
@Jake Thanks. I missed that. But it seems better to add self reference rather staticmethod decorator, because author wants to use some instance properties and method is already called bound –  Odomontois Sep 18 '12 at 6:42
    
This is still instantiating the class every time; the same as Codemonkey's solution, only with less code lines. –  Hossein Sep 18 '12 at 6:48
    
@Hossein: No, it's not. This instantiates it just once as a module global. –  nneonneo Sep 18 '12 at 7:18
    
Yep you're right. I didn't quite get it. Sorry. –  Hossein Sep 18 '12 at 7:22

I'd go with a default argument (evaluated once at function definition time and bound to the function):

def validate_address(addr, validator=AddressValidator())
    return validator.validate(addr)

This is perfectly acceptable if instances of AddressValidator are considered immutable (i.e. they don't contain methods that modify their internal state), and it also allows you to later override the choice of validator should you find the need to (e.g. to provide a validator specialized for a particular country).

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This is in theory a great solution, but the AddressValidator constructor uses a lot of the module's functions which are not ready when validate_address is defined, which means I have to put the definition at the bottom of the file. –  Hubro Sep 18 '12 at 7:56
    
any problem in doing that? Seems like this is basically a thin wrapper around AddressValidator.validate anyway (note that wrappers this thin are not typically considered Pythonic...) –  nneonneo Sep 18 '12 at 7:57
    
It's not a problem, it's just bothersome. I have my classes and functions grouped and organised in a way that makes sense, and having to pull one of my functions out of that beautiful pattern and put it at the bottom of the file gives me OCD cramps. I ended up just removing the wrappers and using @odomontois' solution. –  Hubro Sep 18 '12 at 8:04
    
...doesn't that method also require instantiating AddressValidator immediately? –  nneonneo Sep 18 '12 at 8:05
    
Yes. What I meant is that I did away with the shortcuts and just instantiate the class where I need it now. That doesn't make sense when looking at my example, but my real implementation is a tad more complex. –  Hubro Sep 18 '12 at 9:20

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