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I have a class ExProperty something like below:

class ExProperty
{
    private int m_asimplevar;
    private readonly int _s=2;

    public ExProperty(int iTemp)
    {
        m_asimplevar = iTemp;  
    }

    public void Asimplemethod()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(m_asimplevar);
    }

    public int Property
    {
        get {return m_asimplevar ;}
        //since there is no set, this property is just made readonly.
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var ap = new ExProperty(2);
        Console.WriteLine(ap.Property);
    }
}
  1. What is the sole purpose of making/using a property readonly or write only? I see, through the following program that readonly achieves the same purpose!

  2. When I make the property read-only, I think it should not be writable. When I use

    public void Asimplemethod()
    {
        _s=3; //Compiler reports as "Read only field cannot be used as assignment"
        System.Console.WriteLine(m_asimplevar);
    }
    

    Yes, this is ok.

    But, If i use

    public ExProperty(int iTemp)
    {
        _s = 3 ; //compiler reports no error. May be read-only does not apply to constructors functions ?
    }
    

    Why does the compiler report no error in this case ?

  3. Is declaring _s=3 ok? Or should I declare _s and assign its value using a constructor?

share|improve this question
    
Oops! I was wrong in first question. "Readonly variables cannot be modified/written explicitly even by the methods of its class". Making a property readonly makes the varible readonly to other classes, however you can use/assign values to it using the methods of the class to which it belongs to! –  now he who must not be named. Sep 18 '12 at 6:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, the readonly keyword means that the field can be written to only in a field initializer and in constructors.

If you want, you can combine readonly with the property approach. The private backing field for the property can be declared readonly while the property itself has only a getter. Then the backing field can be assigned to only in constructors (and in its possible field initializer).

Another thing you could consider is making a public readonly field. Since the field itself is read-only, you actually don't achieve much from the setter if all it does is returning the field value.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Jeppe. But, what is the solepoint of using a property which is readonly or write-only when we can declare a variable itself as readonly ? –  now he who must not be named. Sep 18 '12 at 6:25
1  
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed.: Because you might want to be able to modify the variable internally. –  Mehrdad Sep 18 '12 at 6:26
    
Thanks Mehrad. But, the third question is still unanswered ? –  now he who must not be named. Sep 18 '12 at 6:34
1  
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed. It's always fine to initialize the field when you declare it (called a field initializer), but of course in some cases you don't know its value already then. If you declare the field as const then you have to initialize it with the declaration, and it has to be initialized to a compile-time constant, and the const field cannot be assigned to, not even in constructors. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 18 '12 at 6:50

Key point of properties is to provide interface for outside of the class. By not defining Set or by making it private, you make it "read-only" for outside of the class, but it can still be changed from inside of the class methods.

By making field readonly, you are saying it should never change, no matter from where this change comes.

share|improve this answer
    
If I had understood your answer correctly, the readonly variable cannot be modified even by the methods of the class to which it belongs to ? (But, in constructor however I can modify its value). Am I right in both cases ? –  now he who must not be named. Sep 18 '12 at 6:36
    
Yes. Readonly can only be set in constructor. –  Euphoric Sep 18 '12 at 6:40
    
Thanks..that was helpful! –  now he who must not be named. Sep 18 '12 at 6:49

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