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I have set of numbers. 66 is set I am working with, but it can be any size set that can be divided into two equal sets (ex. 33 in each)

The numbers are not sequential or in anyway related to each other. There can be duplicates.

I need a math algorithm to determine if there is any way of distributing the numbers between the two sets so that the some of one set of 33 is equal to the some of the other set of 33.

Ex. 1, 8, 5, 12 = 8, 8, 8, 2 (both sides equal to 26).

I know these are equal. I need the algorithm to find this distribution if it exists.

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closed as not a real question by Nasreddine, RandolphCarter, Clyde Lobo, andrewsi, martin clayton Sep 18 '12 at 16:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Have you tried anything? (sounds like homework?) –  BvdVen Sep 18 '12 at 6:55
    
is there a limitation on number of numbers? –  Lupus Sep 18 '12 at 6:55
9  
would you like a coffe with that? –  Freeman Sep 18 '12 at 6:56
    
is this a homework? then mark the question accordingly –  Alexei Kaigorodov Sep 18 '12 at 6:59
    
I hope this isn't homework, but algorithms studying as preparation for some kind of contests. But even if this is a homework, he will be the one without some knowledge. –  Ari Sep 18 '12 at 7:20
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3 Answers

Sort numbers.

Start from highest and add next number to set which has lower sum.

For example, for numbers 9 7 3 3 2:

S0 = S1 = 0

9 to S0, S0 = 9, S1 = 0

7 to S1, S0 = 9, S1 = 7

3 to S1, S0 = 9, S1 = 10

3 to S0, S0 = 12, S1 = 10

2 to S1, S0 = 12, S1 = 12

This algorithm will give you two sets with lowest difference possible.

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Actually lazy algorithm not always gives optimal result, but it's quite good solution for big sets, because it has asymptotic difficulty only O(n * log n). And memory usage is only O(n) –  Gloomcore Sep 18 '12 at 9:24
    
@Gloomcore I'm quite sure my algorithm will give correct answer. I have used it several times. –  Ari Sep 18 '12 at 9:48
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Ari, your algorith gives wrong answer for 13, 12, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5 Correct solution 13 + 12 = 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 5 Your solution: 13 + 5 + 5 and 12 + 5 + 5 + 5 –  Gloomcore Sep 18 '12 at 9:51
    
@Gloomcore you are right. I need to think about it. I always thought it is working. –  Ari Sep 18 '12 at 10:05
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i guess its a straigh forward Knapsack problem

1) Sum up all the numbers lets say S.

2) Using all the numbers as weights, try to fit in a sack of size S>>1

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Your task is well know partition problem. You can find information about it on wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partition_problem

It's NP full task. If you can use approximation algo, then you can use variant of @Ari. But it doesn't always give correct answer. Sample: 13, 12, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5

Best solution, which gives correct answer could be founded using dynamic programming with pseudo-polynomial complexity O(n * s), where n - count of all numbers, s - their total sum.

Let's you will have P - array of the numbers. Then exact solution is:

bool hasSolution(long n, long *P, long sum)
{
   long A[SIZE][SIZE] = {{0}};
   for (long i = 1; i <= n; i++)
       for (long j= 1; j <= sum / 2; j++)
          if (j-P[i]>=0) 
             A[i][j] = MAX (A[i-1][j] , A[i-1][j-P[i - 1]] + P[i - 1])
          else
             A[i][j] = A[i-1][j];

   bool hasSolution = (A[n][sum / 2] == sum / 2);
   return hasSolution;
}
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