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I am reading tick value of the record with largest id. What is the difference between following queries that causes to slow execution?

Slow Query:

SELECT tick
FROM   eventlog
WHERE  id IN (SELECT max(id) FROM eventlog)

Quick Query:

SELECT max(id) INTO @id
FROM   eventlog;

SELECT tick
FROM   eventlog
WHERE  id = @id;

Schema

CREATE TABLE eventlog (
    id INT (11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    tick INT NOT NULL,
    eventType_id INT NOT NULL,
    compType INT (10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    compID INT (10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    value_double DOUBLE NOT NULL,
    value_int INT (10),
    hierarchy_id VARCHAR (255) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (id),
    INDEX htet (
        hierarchy_id,
        tick,
        eventType_id
    )
)
share|improve this question
2  
Why using a "IN" in your first clause if you return a single Max value and not a range or enumeration of value ?! –  Vincent B. Sep 18 '12 at 7:00
3  
run with EXPLAIN and you will find the answer that how many rows are involved in both query –  diEcho Sep 18 '12 at 7:01
    
@VincentB. I supposed that using '=' in place of 'in' will give a syntax error. It doesn't. –  mmdemirbas Sep 19 '12 at 6:05
    
@diEcho Thanks, I run with EXPLAIN. Actually, Marcus explained better than MySql :) –  mmdemirbas Sep 19 '12 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because the in query doesn't use index, the mysql will scan all the records to find the row.

From http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-indexes.html

B-Tree Index Characteristics

A B-tree index can be used for column comparisons in expressions that use the =, >, >=, <, <=, or BETWEEN operators.

There's no IN

And

Hash Index Characteristics

Hash indexes have somewhat different characteristics from those just discussed:

They are used only for equality comparisons that use the = or <=> operators (but are very fast). They are not used for comparison operators such as < that find a range of values.

there's no IN either.

As @tombom mentioned, foo IN ('bar', 'bla') is short for foo = 'bar' OR foo = 'bla', however, I believe they're different. So I make a test on a table with enough data records, and find out the following:

mysql> show columns from t_key;   
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| a     | int(11) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| b     | int(11) | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select count(a) from t_key;
+----------+
| count(a) |
+----------+
|   989901 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> explain select a from t_key where a in (select max(a) from t_key);  
+----+--------------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+--------+------------------------------+
| id | select_type        | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows   | Extra                        |
+----+--------------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+--------+------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY            | t_key | index | NULL          | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL | 989901 | Using where; Using index     |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | NULL  | NULL  | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL |   NULL | Select tables optimized away |
+----+--------------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+--------+------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> explain select a from t_key where a =(select max(a) from t_key);
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra                        |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | t_key | const | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | const |    1 | Using index                  |
|  2 | SUBQUERY    | NULL  | NULL  | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL  | NULL | Select tables optimized away |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Then I try the IN query with static sequences, it works as @tombom mentioned:

mysql> explain select a from t_key where a in (100,200);
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | t_key | range | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL |    2 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> explain select a from t_key where a=100 or a=200;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | t_key | range | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL |    2 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

I don't know whether the mysql would convert the IN query into ORs one when possible(for instance, the sequences is known before query), and I didn't find related documents, but the explain shows that it did scan the table in this situation.

share|improve this answer
    
-1, That's nonsense, foo IN ('bar', 'bla') is just a shorter way to write foo = 'bar' OR foo = 'bla' –  fancyPants Sep 18 '12 at 8:10
    
@tombom, I've updated my answer. –  Marcus Sep 18 '12 at 9:08
    
+1 for showing the difference. Good work. –  fancyPants Sep 18 '12 at 9:12
1  
The only time when IN and = perform the same is when MySQL can obviously infer the number of arguments. In that case, it will automatically unroll the IN into series of OR. With the SELECT subquery, it can't do any unrolling, so it doesn't know what you're getting. For that reason, it's going to scan the table (or, well, index) for any possible matches. If you use =, it's going to pull a const out of index. Expect several-fold performance degradation with IN. –  Naltharial Sep 18 '12 at 9:15

Try to look at query plan, DBMS probably is unable to use the index in that case. Try changing the query as:

SELECT tick
FROM   eventlog
WHERE  id = (SELECT max(id) FROM eventlog)

EDIT There is actually probably better way to to that. In the above query you perform two INDEX ACCESS operations (or additionaly one INDEX RANGE SCAN if the index isn't unique) and one TABLE ACCESS. Instead you can do that:

SELECT tick
FROM   eventlog
ORDER BY id DESC
LIMIT 1

With this one there should be one INDEX ACCESS plus one TABLE ACCESS. In fact, there might be rather small difference, because TABLE ACCESS is signifincantly more expensive operation, so the difference may be seen rather on big data sets.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep that's also what I would have done. –  Vincent B. Sep 18 '12 at 7:09
    
Thanks for improved query suggestion. –  mmdemirbas Sep 19 '12 at 6:02

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