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I am reading a tutorial regarding a Java pacman game.

Here is the code in question.

   if (pacmanx % blocksize == 0 && pacmany % blocksize == 0) {
        pos = // integer         
        ch = screendata[pos];

        if ((ch & 16) != 0) { // do not understand this.
            screendata[pos] = (short)(ch & 15);
            ...
        }

I am not really understanding the single &. I understand this operand checks both sides of an if statement, or is a bitwise operator. However, per the tests below, it doesn't seem to be either:

if I was to test (ch = 18):
(ch & 16) = 16
(ch & 8) = 0
(ch & 2) = 2

thanks

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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

& is the bitwise operator AND:

18 = 10010
16 = 10000
----------
16 = 10000


18 = 10010
 8 = 01000
----------
 0 = 00000

So the if will check if the fifth bit is 1 or 0.

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ok, understood the bitwise operator. however, what is the if statement doing? I dont understand, what you mean by checking the fifth bit –  dgamma3 Sep 18 '12 at 8:46
    
@dgamma3 The information for the pacman game seems to be somehow endoded bitwise. The if checks if the fifth bit is set (is equal to 1). If so, the first four bits are used for the screendata... Can't really guess more based on this code snippet. –  Baz Sep 18 '12 at 8:48
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That's not a Boolean and, which is always &&; instead it's a bitwise and. It's checking to see if the 5th bit from the right is set in ch.

ch = 18  //      ch = 0b00010100
ch & 16  //      16 = 0b00010000
         // ch & 16 = 0b00010000 != 0
ch & 8   //       8 = 0b00001000
         // ch &  8 = 0b00000000 == 0
ch & 2   //       2 = 0b00000010
         // ch &  2 = 0b00000010 != 0
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The single & it's a bitwise AND. It's an and operation performed on individual bit of your number.

Consider a possible bit representation of your short:

10011011 &   : screendata[pos]
00010000 =   : 16
----------
10010000

Specifically this line:

if ((ch & 16) != 0) {

check if the 5-th bit (2^ (5 -1)) of your number is set to 1 (different from 0).

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Given ch = 18

(ch & 16) = 16
(ch & 8) = 0
(ch & 2) = 2

seems correct. What's 18 in binary ? 16 | 2 or 10010 in binary.

To be clear, & is a bitwise operator. However && returns true if both operands are true.

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Single ampersand is a bitwise AND operator.

You might find it easier to "get" if the values were in hex.

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The bitwise and operator & performs an "and" on each bit of the two integers to determine the result.

So:

18 = 0001 0010
16 = 0001 0000
18&16 = 0001 0000

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& is bitwise operator AND. You can see detail in http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/op3.html

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