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I was wondering what would be the preferred technique in Oracle to copy multiple records into a database that ignored duplicate values on a certain index. the statements are stated explicitly in the statement and don't come from another table

INSERT INTO EXAMPLE (A, B, C, D) VALUES (null,'example1','example2',EXAMPLE_SEQ.nextval);
INSERT INTO EXAMPLE (A, B, C, D) VALUES (null,'example2','example3',EXAMPLE_SEQ.nextval);
INSERT INTO EXAMPLE (A, B, C, D) VALUES (null,'example4','example5',EXAMPLE_SEQ.nextval);

I am currently doing it like this and checking manually, but need to find a way so that these can be handled as scripts

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you can execute as script them (F5 in SQL Developer, you have a simillar button in Toad, Sql Navigator, etc). It just log an error and goes on. –  Florin Ghita Sep 18 '12 at 8:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you've decided to stick with INSERTs you can prevent insertion of duplicate rows by using constraints whether it primary key or unique key. If it happens to violate a unique constraint your script will stop and you'll have to roollback all changes made by previous inserts(unless you have committed every single of them). To handle that exception you could write a similar pls/sql block.

declare
  l_unique_exception exception;
  pragma exception_init(l_unique_exception, -1);
begin
  insert into test(id, test_vector)
    values(1, 123);
  insert into test(id, test_vector)
   values(1, 123);
  ......
  Insert into 
  commit;
exception
  when l_unique_exception
    then process the exception;    
end;  

IN ADDITION

If you want to proceed after one of the inserts raises an exception then the following example might be in handy.

  1. Create a table that going to contain errors. For example.

    CREATE TABLE tb_errors ( ErrorTag varchar2(123) )

  2. Provide an error logging invoking CREATE_ERROR_LOG procedure of DBMS_ERRLOG package

    DBMS_ERRLOG.CREATE_ERROR_LOG('YourDmlTable. Test in this case', 'tb_errors');

  3. Add log errors into clause to each insert

Here is an example

declare
begin
  insert into test(id, col1)
     values(1, 123)
     log errors into tb_errors('simple expression') reject limit unlimited;   
  insert into test(id, col1)
     values(1, 123)
     log errors into tb_errors('simple expression') reject limit unlimited;   
  insert into test(id, col1)
     values(1, 123) 
     log errors into tb_errors('simple expression') reject limit unlimited;
  commit;
end;

After your script is completed you can query error logging table, tb_errors in this case, to see what went wrong.

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I am going with this technique, I don't understand how you're catching a unique key violation though, it doesn't seem to be an error you can catch according to the Oracle Documentation for 11g –  user898465 Sep 18 '12 at 13:56
    
OK, I realise what you are doing here assigning a custom error to be thrown whenever ORA - 00001 is thrown. However this doesn't work for me. I handle it just by throwing null however the script still fails and rollsback. –  user898465 Sep 18 '12 at 14:38
    
I've made some changes –  Nicholas Krasnov Sep 18 '12 at 19:06

You should look at the MERGE syntax.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merge_(SQL)

merge example target
using (select 1 as id, 'a' as val) as source
    on source.id = target.id
    and source.val = target.val
when not matched then
    insert (id, val) values (source.id, source.val);
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All of the merge examples I've seen merge one table into another. I haven't seen an example of explicitly stated values in the script being inserted. –  user898465 Sep 18 '12 at 8:59
    
@user898465 See example –  podiluska Sep 18 '12 at 9:05
    
Am I right in assuming you would have to use a separate merge block for every insert? Seems like an awful lot of code for quite a basic insert. –  user898465 Sep 18 '12 at 9:27
    
No - you could put all your source data into the source section –  podiluska Sep 18 '12 at 9:29
    
@user898465: only a single merge statement is required. You can put all the values into the using part: select 1 as id, 'a' as val from dual union all select 2, 'b' from dual union all ... –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 18 '12 at 9:30

I suggest you to use LOG error clause if you have a goal to provide additional treatment of incorrect data. Please consider http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/10g/dml-error-logging-10gr2.php - good example is there.

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