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I am connecting to a database and I am taking an input from STDIN that I use as part of an execution. So I have:

my $i = 0;

while($i != 1) {
    print "Input: ";
    my $input = <STDIN>;
    chomp $input;
    my $test = $dbh->prepare("show tables like $input");

and then I want to check that the input is a valid entry in the database and loop round again if it isn't:

    if ($test->execute()) {
        print "Input exists in database\n";
        $i = 1;
    }
    else {
        print "Input does not exist.\n";
    }
} # end of while

I know that this does not work, but I would like something similar that isn't execute or die as I do not want to exit my program. Is this possible?

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1  
Several possible solutions. First, your DBI connection doesn't HAVE to use RaiseError=>1. Setting it to =>0 means you'll have to do your own checking. The other (probably better) solution is to use eval { # code that could die }, or Try::Tiny's try { # code that could die } –  DavidO Sep 18 '12 at 8:59
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2 Answers

You have two options:

1) Disable the RaiseError attribute for the database handle. This can be done when creating the connection:

$dbh = DBI->connect($dsn, $user, $password, { RaiseError => 0 });

This would of course require you to handle errors yourself by testing $DBI::err on the appropriate places.

2) Catch the error. Either by using one of the Try/Catch frameworks (TryCatch or Try::Tiny are the ones I would recommend) or by using eval by hand. For example:

if (defined( eval { $test->execute() // 0 } ) {
    print "Success";
} else {
    pring "Bugger, I died...: $DBI:Err";
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I actually found the solution I wanted a different way, but thanks to pmakholm for answering.

my $i = 0;

while($i != 1) {
    print "Input: ";
    my $input = <STDIN>;
    chomp $input;
    my $test = $dbh->prepare("show tables like $input");
    my $var = $test->execute();
    if ($var != 0) {
        print "Input exists in database\n";
        $i = 1;
    }
    else {
        print "Input does not exist.\n";
    }
} # end of while

What I didn't think of is that even if I enter nonsense into the database, I'm looking to see if that table exists - and if it doesn't it just returns an empty set, so I can check if is zero (checking if NULL or similar may be better but this works). I thought that it would return an error, but it doesn't. pmakholm - I shall use your method if I need to check that query works, so thanks.

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