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Here is my problem:

I have a binary value

101001

and a mask

011100

I would like to compare them and get the result as an integer. In this case that would give:

1 010 01
0 111 00

= 010 => 2

My first idea consists of dealing with a character array. But I would like to know if there is a better way to achieve this aim in Java?

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but it's not 2, the result of applying the mask would be 01000 - unless I'm missing some logic that you are aware of.. –  Nim Sep 18 '12 at 8:57
    
I agree. But in my case I need to get 2. It may not be a bitmask, I'm sorry if I did use the right words... –  n0n0bstan Sep 18 '12 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I just improved the algorithm to be able to have mask where one bits can be splitted such as:

00111011011

Here is my function to get a value from a mask and a masked value

 private static long getMaskedValue(long maskedValue, long mask){
        long definitiveMaskedValue = 0;
        int count=0;

        maskedValue = mask & maskedValue;

        while (mask != 0){
            while ((mask & 1) == 0){
                mask = mask >>> 1;
                maskedValue = maskedValue >>> 1;
            }
            while ((mask & 1) == 1){
                definitiveMaskedValue = definitiveMaskedValue + ((maskedValue & 1) << count);
                count++;

                mask = mask >>> 1;
                maskedValue = maskedValue >>> 1;
            }
        }

        return definitiveMaskedValue;
    }

Here is my function to store a value in a variable thanks to a bitmask, it returns the old variable with the value stored inside. I had to use BigInteger because of the shift operator that can not shift more than 32bits left in Java.

private static long setMaskedValue (long maskedValue, long mask, long valueToAdd) {
            int nbZero=0;
            int nbLeastSignificantBit=0;
            long tmpMask=mask;
            maskedValue = maskedValue & ~mask;

            while (tmpMask != 0){
                while ((tmpMask & 1) == 0){
                    tmpMask = tmpMask >>> 1;
                    nbLeastSignificantBit++;
                    nbZero ++;
                }

                while ((tmpMask & 1) == 1){
                    tmpMask = tmpMask >>> 1;

                    BigInteger bigValueToAdd = BigInteger.valueOf(valueToAdd).shiftLeft(nbZero);
                    long tmpValueToAdd = bigValueToAdd.longValue();
                    BigInteger bigMaskOneBit = BigInteger.valueOf(1).shiftLeft(nbLeastSignificantBit);
                    long maskOneBit = bigMaskOneBit.longValue();

                    long bitValueToSet = getMaskedValue(tmpValueToAdd, maskOneBit);
                    maskedValue = maskedValue | bitValueToSet << nbLeastSignificantBit;
                    nbLeastSignificantBit++;
                }
            }
        return maskedValue;
    }
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why using BigInt for a simple problem like that? Just a waste of resource. Handling a special corner case for shifting 32 bits is still much faster than doing BigInt's maths –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Jun 24 '14 at 8:56

I would like to compare them and get the result as an integer

Assuming you meant 'mask' rather than 'compare':

int result = 0B011100 & 0B011100;

No char arrays required.

This is rather trivial.

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It won't return 010, though it's rather unclear why OP wants the result shifted. –  João Silva Sep 18 '12 at 8:57
    
not so simple: System.out.println("TEST: " +(28 & 41)); returns 8 ! (01000) instead of 2 (010) –  n0n0bstan Sep 18 '12 at 9:04
    
Because you need to shift right to eliminate those 2 zeros ;-) –  helios Sep 18 '12 at 9:12
    
that's it ! It's seems obvious, but I never used shift operators before ;) thank you ! –  n0n0bstan Sep 18 '12 at 9:29
    
I deliberately mentioned the assumption I was working on. Clearly the OP has left something out of his question. –  EJP Sep 18 '12 at 10:25

Of course.

  1. You need first AND your bits.
  2. Shift right to avoid those zeros at right of mask.

You need value as integer already.

Then do the AND: int masked = value & mask;

Then shift right until the first 1 in the mask.

while (mask % 2 == 0) {
   mask = mask >>> 1;
   masked = masked >>> 1;
}

You can use while (mask & 1 == 0) { if you prefer :)


& is bitwise AND.
| is bitwise OR.
^ is bitwise XOR (if my memory doesn't fail :).
>>> is shifting right (unsigned integer)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much ! –  n0n0bstan Sep 18 '12 at 9:26

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