Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

At the moment I execute a native process using the following:

java.lang.Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command); 
int returnCode = process.waitFor();

Suppose instead of waiting for the program to return I wish to terminate if a certain amount of time has elapsed. How do I do this?

share|improve this question
    
Please find a good practice and some explantion here : <stackoverflow.com/questions/5138946/…; –  Wulfaz Jul 16 '13 at 13:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This is how the Plexus CommandlineUtils does it:

Process p;

p = cl.execute();

...

if ( timeoutInSeconds <= 0 )
{
    returnValue = p.waitFor();
}
else
{
    long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long timeoutInMillis = 1000L * timeoutInSeconds;
    long finish = now + timeoutInMillis;
    while ( isAlive( p ) && ( System.currentTimeMillis() < finish ) )
    {
        Thread.sleep( 10 );
    }
    if ( isAlive( p ) )
    {
        throw new InterruptedException( "Process timeout out after " + timeoutInSeconds + " seconds" );
    }
    returnValue = p.exitValue();
}

public static boolean isAlive( Process p ) {
    try
    {
        p.exitValue();
        return false;
    } catch (IllegalThreadStateException e) {
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Ewwww...so every 10 milliseconds it relies on p.exitValue() throwing IllegalThreadStateException to indicate "still running"? –  Ogre Psalm33 Apr 9 '12 at 22:02
    
@OgrePsalm33 It's awful, but sadly Java gives no nicer way up to Java 7. Java8 gives a "p.isAlive()" –  leonbloy May 16 at 18:17

All other responses are correct but it can be made more robust and efficient using FutureTask.

For example,

private static final ExecutorService THREAD_POOL 
    = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

private static <T> T timedCall(Callable<T> c, long timeout, TimeUnit timeUnit)
    throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException, TimeoutException
{
    FutureTask<T> task = new FutureTask<T>(c);
    THREAD_POOL.execute(task);
    return task.get(timeout, timeUnit);
}

try {
    int returnCode = timedCall(new Callable<int>() {
        public int call() throws Exception
        {
            java.lang.Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command); 
            return process.waitFor();
        }, timeout, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
} catch (TimeoutException e) {
    // Handle timeout here
}

If you do this repeatedly, the thread pool is more efficient because it caches the threads.

share|improve this answer
    
The handle timeout here could be a little more robust for an example. I have a couple of mechanisms I use, but for the simplest case, use something like: catch (TimeoutException e) { System.exit(-1);} –  John Yeary Nov 10 '12 at 15:49

What about the Groovy way

public void yourMethod() {
    ...
    Process process = new ProcessBuilder(...).start(); 
    //wait 5 secs or kill the process
    waitForOrKill(process, TimeUnit.SECONDS.toMillis(5));
    ...
}

public static void waitForOrKill(Process self, long numberOfMillis) {
    ProcessRunner runnable = new ProcessRunner(self);
    Thread thread = new Thread(runnable);
    thread.start();
    runnable.waitForOrKill(numberOfMillis);
}

protected static class ProcessRunner implements Runnable {
    Process process;
    private boolean finished;

    public ProcessRunner(Process process) {
        this.process = process;
    }

    public void run() {
        try {
            process.waitFor();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // Ignore
        }
        synchronized (this) {
            notifyAll();
            finished = true;
        }
    }

    public synchronized void waitForOrKill(long millis) {
        if (!finished) {
            try {
                wait(millis);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // Ignore
            }
            if (!finished) {
                process.destroy();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You'd need a 2. thread that interrupts the thread that calls .waitFor(); Some non trivial synchronization will be needed to make it robust, but the basics are:

TimeoutThread:

 Thread.sleep(timeout);
 processThread.interrupt();

ProcessThread:

  try {
      proc.waitFor(); 
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
       proc.destroy();
    }
share|improve this answer

just modified a bit according to my requirement. time out is 10 seconds here. process is getting destroyed after 10 seconds if it is not exiting.

public static void main(String arg[])
{


    try{

    Process p =Runtime.getRuntime().exec("\"C:/Program Files/VanDyke Software/SecureCRT/SecureCRT.exe\"");
    long now = System.currentTimeMillis(); 
    long timeoutInMillis = 1000L * 10; 
    long finish = now + timeoutInMillis; 
    while ( isAlive( p ) )
    { 
        Thread.sleep( 10 ); 
        if ( System.currentTimeMillis() > finish ) {

            p.destroy();

        }



    } 

    }
    catch (Exception err) {
      err.printStackTrace();

        }
}

public static boolean isAlive( Process p ) {  
    try  
    {  
        p.exitValue();  
        return false;  
    } catch (IllegalThreadStateException e) {  
        return true;  
    }  
}  
share|improve this answer

If you're using Java 8 you could simply use the new waitFor with timeout:

Process p = ...
if(!p.waitFor(1, TimeUnit.MINUTE)) {
    //timeout - kill the process. 
    p.destroy(); // consider using destroyForcibly instead
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.