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I have a string type which will return thousands of records in the format

key1,val1,val2,val3,val4,val5:key2,val6,val7,val8,val9,val10:key3,val11,val12,val13,val14,val15

I want to assign this to a dictionary as Key,List so it looks like

key1,[val1,val2,val3,val4,val5]

key2,[val6,val7,val8,val9,val10]

key3,[val11,val12,val13,val14,val15]

. . .

All keys are unique in the string and the List size is constant for all records.

At the moment I'm using Split and looping each record using

    //short example string - may contain 1000's
    string newstr = @"key1,val1,val2,val3,val4,val5:key2,val6,val7,val8,val9,val10:key3,val11,val12,val13,val14,val15";

    Dictionary<string, List<string>> mydictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
    foreach (string item in newstr.Split(':'))
    {
        List<string> list = new List<string>(item.Split(','));
        mydictionary.Add(list[0], list);        
    }

My question is, is there a more efficient/quicker way of doing this for 1000's of records using C#4.0 rather than looping?

UPDATE: having tested the various answers the following are the 'correct' times

enter image description here

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    System.IO.StreamReader myFile =  new System.IO.StreamReader(@"C:\Users\ooo\Desktop\temp.txt");
    string newstr = myFile.ReadToEnd();
    myFile.Close();

    TimeSpan ts;
    TimeSpan te;
    Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopWatch.Start();


    ts = stopWatch.Elapsed;
    Dictionary<string, List<string>> mydictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
    foreach (string item in newstr.Split(':'))
    {
        List<string> list = new List<string>(item.Split(','));
        mydictionary.Add(list[0], list);
    }
    te = stopWatch.Elapsed;
    Console.WriteLine("MyTime: " + (te - ts).ToString());



    ts = stopWatch.Elapsed;
    var result = newstr.Split(':')
         .Select(line => line.Split(','))
         .ToDictionary(bits => bits[0],
                       bits => bits.Skip(1).ToList());
    te = stopWatch.Elapsed;
    Console.WriteLine("JonSkeet: " + (te - ts).ToString());


    ts = stopWatch.Elapsed;
    string[] keysAndValues = newstr.Split(':');
    var newdictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>(keysAndValues.Length);
    foreach (string item in keysAndValues)
    {
        List<string> list = new List<string>(item.Split(','));
        newdictionary.Add(list[0], list);
    }
    te = stopWatch.Elapsed;
    Console.WriteLine("Joe: " + (te - ts).ToString());


    Console.WriteLine("Records: " + mydictionary.Count.ToString());


    stopWatch.Stop();
}
share|improve this question
    
Does your values actually comes in a string? Or is there any "streaming" of the values? –  Steve B Sep 18 '12 at 9:46
    
The looping will have to happen, and often writing it yourself is the fastest. –  Henk Holterman Sep 18 '12 at 9:47
2  
By the look of it, your current code includes the key in the list of items - is this correct/a problem? –  Rawling Sep 18 '12 at 9:47
    
They come in a string in the format shown as one large string. Yes the string also includes the unique keys. –  user3357963 Sep 18 '12 at 9:48
1  
Is there a performance bottleneck in your current implementation? Unless you preprocess the data, you are always going to have to split the string as you have done, whether using RegEx or LINQ or regular string manipulation. –  Dave R. Sep 18 '12 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following is potentially faster, as the Dictionary is constructed with the required capacity to avoid reallocations:

//short example string - may contain 1000's     
string newstr = ...;

string[] keysAndValues = newstr.Split(':');
var mydictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>(keysAndValues.Length);
foreach (string item in keysAndValues)     
{         
    List<string> list = new List<string>(item.Split(','));         
    mydictionary.Add(list[0], list);
    // remove key from list to match Jon Skeet's implementation
    list.RemoveAt(0);
} 

Less readable than Jon Skeet's LINQ version though.

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies Joe, I was doing you a disservice there. I've updated the timings in my original post based on the correct file being imported and processed. –  user3357963 Sep 18 '12 at 10:47
    
Probably you can go slightly slighly faster, by changing the list initialization. i.e. initialize the list with the correct capacity then add the items of the array with for(int i=1; commaSplits.Length; i++) .... RemoveAt(0) is very inefficient in List<T> ... –  digEmAll Sep 18 '12 at 10:54
    
@digEmAll, in fact the List<T> constructor that takes and IEnumerable<T> is smart enough to check for an ICollection<T> and if so initialize to the required capacity. So this won't make any difference. RemoveAt(0) is reasonably efficient in this case: it copies the internal array, but does no reallocation. –  Joe Sep 18 '12 at 11:20
    
@Joe: an inner copy can take some time if the inner list is long, so I pointed out since that overhead can be easily avoided. However, we're talking about crumbs of seconds here... –  digEmAll Sep 18 '12 at 12:22
1  
@digEmAll, OK, I see what you mean now, and also why you said "slightly slightly". –  Joe Sep 18 '12 at 12:43

Running the code you posted against a LINQ solution (like @JonSkeet's) shows that LINQ takes roughly double the time your current approach does for over 1000 records.

Therefore to answer your question:

is there a more efficient/quicker way of doing this for 1000's of records using C#4.0 rather than looping?

I would say no.

Benchmark test code:

 var value = "key{0},val1,val2,val3,val4,val5:";
 string newstr = "";
 for (int i = 0; i <= 1000; i++)
 {
     newstr += String.Format(value, i + 1);
 }

 var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
 sw.Start();
 Dictionary<string, List<string>> mydictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
 foreach (string item in newstr.Split(':'))
 {
     List<string> list = new List<string>(item.Split(','));
     mydictionary.Add(list[0], list);
 }
 sw.Stop();
 Console.WriteLine("Looping time: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
 sw.Reset();
 sw.Start();
 var result = newstr.Split(':')
                    .Select(line => line.Split(','))
                    .ToDictionary(bits => bits[0],
                                  bits => bits.Skip(1).ToList());
 sw.Stop();
 Console.WriteLine("LINQ time: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
 Console.ReadKey(); 
share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't correct. LINQ statements aren't evaluated until they are queried - all you've done is setup the query here, not enumerated the result. Also, there are no colons splitting up the key/value list pairs. –  Dave R. Sep 18 '12 at 10:33
    
@DaveR. +1 your spot on, I wasn't evaluating the LINQ query (or splitting the data with :!). I have updated my answer. –  James Sep 18 '12 at 10:45
    
@DaveR.: that is not correct. ToDictionary() performs an immediate evaluation, there's no need of ToList() –  digEmAll Sep 18 '12 at 11:01
    
@digEmAll in fact, your right. I wasn't sure first time around as I was simply taking Jon Skeet's answer but according to the documentation it does do an immediate evaluation. I have removed the call to ToList. –  James Sep 18 '12 at 11:27
    
Many apologies about the lazy evaluation mix-up. I misread the query and @digEmAll is absolutely correct. –  Dave R. Sep 19 '12 at 14:52

It sounds like you want something like this:

var result = text.Split(':')
                 .Select(line => line.Split(','))
                 .ToDictionary(bits => bits[0],
                               bits => bits.Skip(1).ToList());

It may well not be any more efficient, of course... have you measured that it needs to be? If you're only doing this for "thousands" of records, I'd expect it to be done in the blink of an eye. Furthermore, I'd expect any IO (network, disk) to be the bottleneck before this code is.

From your comment:

it's actually quite fast and not a bottleneck but I always try and avoid loops if there is a quicker alternative

Don't do that. Aim for the simplest code which does the job, then check whether it performs well enough. Personally I prefer my LINQ-based code, but your existing code is fine too. Any faster alternative is likely to end up being significantly harder to write, read and maintain. Why would you go to that effort if the benefit is insignificant?

Note that my code doesn't have the key as the first value in the list - it matches the specification, but not your sample code.

share|improve this answer
    
Neater, yes. But is it "more efficient/quicker" ? –  Henk Holterman Sep 18 '12 at 9:48
    
You miss a closing bracket after Split(',') –  digEmAll Sep 18 '12 at 9:51
    
@Jon - thanks for this. I'll measure the speed and report back :) –  user3357963 Sep 18 '12 at 9:53
    
@digEmAll: Fixed, thanks. –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '12 at 9:55
    
@Jon - and text.Split(':') –  user3357963 Sep 18 '12 at 10:22

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