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I want to figure out a solution for automatic logical relationship check. For example, I have a function IsGood(), it will get the bool value from a, b, c .... In the main program, there is if(a||b) or if(b&&c) or if(g&&!k&&l||!z), different relationship. I want to replace all of them with IsGood(), and I want to make this function more general, it can handle different logical relationship.

So my idea is to put some ID, which will help this function to know which variables are required to handle now, for example, IsGood() got value k1,k2,k3, but the logical relationship ||,&& between k1,k2,k3 are not known by IsGood().

So I want to know how to let IsGood() automatically get the relationship between values. Store them in database??

Like : IsGood() firstly check that it is in the place1, so it queries the database, the result is : (this why I don't take parameters in IsGood(), it will retrieve the variables it needs from database or configuration file, what it needs is only the placeID.)

place 1 (the place number); k1,k2,k3 (variable name); true,true,false(value); &&, || (logical relationship).

But I don't think it is good...So, could you give me some ideas? Thanks a lot! My work is based on C++.

I want to know some ideas about this :

a||b&&c, I can store the information, like 0,1, so 0 represents ||, 1 represents &&, so the structure like a&&b||c...is easy to control.

But how to set (a||b)&&c? I also want to find a way to record this relationship. A smart method will be appreciated!! Thanks.

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I don't follow. :( –  Luchian Grigore Sep 18 '12 at 9:58
1  
Maybe try showing code to illustrate the problem, what you'd like to be able to do, what you've tried so far, and why it doesn't work. –  tenfour Sep 18 '12 at 10:01
    
Am I correct that what you are looking to do is implicitly replace if(a||b) and if(b&&c) with if(IsGood(a)||IsGood(b)) and if(IsGood(b)&&IsGood(c))? If a, b, and c are of custom types, you might find it easier to implement operator bool() for each type. –  Anthony Burleigh Sep 18 '12 at 10:03
    
No,I think I can do it with IsGood(placeID), the problem is that I want to make a general method to handle different logical relationship between variables. This is a optimization for my project. –  Alex Sep 18 '12 at 10:17
    
Then what you're looking for is to pass a list of boolean values and logical operators to a function which will parse them and calculate the result? I find it very difficult to believe this will be an optimization over using short-circuit operators and letting the compiler handle the rest. Have you tried profiling to find if anything else in your code is slowing it down? Never assume what needs to be optimized! –  Anthony Burleigh Sep 18 '12 at 10:27
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This can't work. Period.

In C++, variables have scope. The name k1 may mean different things in different places. Therefore, even if the function IsGood magically knew that it somehow should access a variable named k1, it still has no way whatsoever to figure out which k1 from which scope that would be.

This is not a big deal for C++ programmers. Their solution: IsGood(k1), which means: call IsGood with this k1 variable from the current scope, and not another.

Now, passing operators is a bit harder. You need lambda's for that: IsGood( [&k1,&k2,&k3](){return (k1&&k2)||k3;} );. This takes a reference to the variables k1-3, and passes the expression (k1&&k2)||k3; to IsGood. Or in two lines:

auto myLambda = [&k1,&k2,&k3](){return (k1&&k2)||k3;} ;
IsGood(myLambda);

Again, this all works because you pass IsGood the information it needs. It can't get it any other way.

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I would first start off by defining a set of logical operations that work on a given object, for example:

// This is just a simple wrapper for the first argument
template <typename T>
struct FirstOp
{
  FirstOp(T const& v) : _v(v)
  { }

  T const & operator*() const { return _v; }

  T const& _v;
};

template <typename T>
struct AndOp
{
  AndOp(T const& v) : _v(v)
  { }

  T const & operator*() const { return _v; }

  // Then hack the stream operator
  template <typename O>
  O const & operator>>(O const & o) const
  {
    if (o)
      o = o && _v; // assumes T supports safe bool

    return o;
  }

  T const& _v;
};

template <typename T>
struct OrOp
{
  OrOp(T const& v) : _v(v)
  { }

  T const& operator*() const { return _v; }

  // Then hack the stream operator
  template <typename O>
  O const & operator>>(O const & o) const
  {
    if (!o)
      o = o || _v; // assumes T supports safe bool

    return o;
  }

  T const& _v;
};

template <typename Op1>
struct ResultOf
{
  ResultOf(Op1 const& cOp) : _o1(cOp), _r(*_o1)
  { }

  ResultOf const & operator=(bool r) const
  { _r = r; return *this; }

  operator bool() const { return _r; }

  // Then hack the stream operator
  template <typename O>
  ResultOf& operator>>(O& o)
  {
    o >> *this;
    return *this;
  }

  Op1 const& _o1;
  mutable bool _r;
};

Then define a IsGood to accept parameters, overload to support more parameters.

template <typename T1, typename T2>
bool IsGood(T1 const& t1, T2 const& t2)
{
  return ResultOf<T1>(t1) >> t2;
}

Then you can call as follows.

int main(void)
{
  std::cout << IsGood(FirstOp<int>(0), OrOp<int>(1)) << std::endl;
}

So what this approach has allowed you to do is to wrap the value that you want to use for a specific logical operation with that operation and then pass it to the generic IsGood function. Now here, the actual operators that are constructed is hard-coded, but there is nothing that prevents you reading this from a file for example and then constructing the appropriate operators to pass to IsGood. NOTE: The above is short-circuiting, so will only evaluate the arguments as necessary (function calls will be made), but expressions will not be evaluated. You should be able to use the above approach to make arbitrarily complex logical relationships.

DISCLAIMER: This is my limited understanding of your problem... if it's off the mark, ah well...

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but how can you control the situation that this time IsGood() got k1,k2,k3, but next time it got k4,k6,k7,k8. And the logical relationship between them should be know. –  Alex Sep 18 '12 at 10:58
    
@Alex, how do you "get" k1, k2, k3 and in a different situation get k4, k5, k6, k7? –  Nim Sep 18 '12 at 11:14
    
I set in configuration, so different places use different variables –  Alex Sep 18 '12 at 11:56
    
@Alex, yes, but you have to write some code to read in the set of variables, and the logic to apply to those variables, once you've read them in, construct the above operators and then pass them to the IsGood() function. It's not clear to me how you do this currently, the above solves how you apply a general set of logical operations, the missing piece is how your read works... –  Nim Sep 18 '12 at 12:04
    
...or is your problem you don't know how to parse some input to determine the set of logical operations? For example, it's trivial to create a parser to parse simple syntax such as follows (a && b) || c. –  Nim Sep 18 '12 at 12:06
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