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I am rewriting an old system and I have created a schema from an XML document using xsd.exe and then generated .NET code from the xsd using xsd.exe/xsd2code. However there seems to be a flaw, possibly in the design of the original xml document or the way that it has been generated but I don't know enough about schemas to correct the problem. Here is a cleaned up sample that illustrates the problem:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" elementFormDefault="qualified">
  <xs:element name="ABC">
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:all>
        <xs:element ref="ABC_HEADER"/>
        <xs:element name="BODY_A" minOccurs="0" />
        <xs:element name="BODY_B" minOccurs="0" />
        <xs:element name="BODY_C" minOccurs="0" />
      </xs:all>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
</xs:schema>

The idea is that the ABC class is a message that contains a header and a single body element that can be of various types (I did not design this). When the generated class is serialized I get one of each of the body classes in the output XML:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ABC>
  <ABC_HEADER>
  </ABC_HEADER>
  <BODY_A></BODY_A>
  <BODY_B></BODY_B>
  <BODY_C></BODY_C>

Given that I cannot change the design and that the produced XML needs to match the legacy XML is the <xs:all> choice the right way to represent this or would <xs:sequence> or something else be a better choice?

Alternatively, do I need to write some custom (pre)serialization code that generates the correct output?

Edit: Despite the good answers in the end I had to write custom serialization code for the <ABC> element but combined with ordinary serialization (with xml declaration removed) for the <ABC_HEADER> and <BODY_> elements

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Did you try this ?

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
                                    elementFormDefault="qualified">
  <xs:element name="ABC_HEADER" type="xs:string"/>
  <xs:element name="ABC">
    <xs:complexType>
      <xs:sequence>
        <xs:element ref="ABC_HEADER"/>
        <xs:choice>
          <xs:element name="BODY_A"/>
          <xs:element name="BODY_B"/>
          <xs:element name="BODY_C"/>
        </xs:choice>
      </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>
</xs:schema>

EDIT : Did you try inheritance schema with something like :

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<xs:schema elementFormDefault="qualified" 
           xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">

  <xs:complexType name="ABC">
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element ref="ABC_HEADER" />
      <xs:element name="BODY" type="BODY" />
    </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>

  <xs:complexType name="BODY">
    <xs:sequence />
  </xs:complexType>

  <xs:complexType name="BODY_A">
    <xs:complexContent mixed="false">
      <xs:extension base="BODY">
        <!-- define BODY_A schema here -->
      </xs:extension>
    </xs:complexContent>
  </xs:complexType>

  <xs:complexType name="BODY_B">
    <xs:complexContent mixed="false">
      <xs:extension base="BODY">
        <!-- define BODY_B schema here -->
      </xs:extension>
    </xs:complexContent>
  </xs:complexType>

  <xs:complexType name="BODY_C">
    <xs:complexContent mixed="false">
      <xs:extension base="BODY">
        <!-- define BODY_C schema here -->
      </xs:extension>
    </xs:complexContent>
  </xs:complexType>

</xs:schema>
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That seems to be the correct answer - will test to make sure first though. Thanks –  Clara Onager Sep 19 '12 at 9:34
    
I've marked this as the answer as it's the most correct one. However it does not produce the XML required so I've had to resort to handcoding the serialization in part –  Clara Onager Sep 24 '12 at 9:44
    
In WCF, I would define a base class BODY and make every type of available body inherit from it. This should generate an other schema, see edit. –  Paciv Sep 24 '12 at 10:53
    
I added the inheritance into the classes instead - my knowledge of schemas isn't sufficient to alter the schema in order to get the code I need –  Clara Onager Sep 24 '12 at 14:23
    
To generate this schema, I actually typed inherited classes and let WCF generate the schema by itself. Starting by one or the other doesn't really matter as long as it match your legacy format. –  Paciv Sep 24 '12 at 14:26

If the order of BODY_A,BODY_B, and BODY_C is important than use the sequence element, otherwise you can use the all element. It sounds like you want to use the sequence element though.

The all element specifies that the child elements can appear in any order and that each child element can occur zero or one time.

Source

The sequence element specifies that the child elements must appear in a sequence. Each child element can occur from 0 to any number of times.

Source

I would also continue to use the minOccurs="0" indicator.

Full Schema Reference

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Only the HEADER then BODY sequence is important, there will only ever be one BODY element –  Clara Onager Sep 24 '12 at 9:48

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