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Two words are anagrams if one of them has exactly same characters as that of the another word.

Example : Anagram & Nagaram are anagrams (case-insensitive).

Now there are many questions similar to this . A couple of approaches to find whether two strings are anagrams are :

1) Sort the strings and compare them.

2) Create a frequency map for these strings and check if they are the same or not.

But in this case , we are given with a word (for the sake of simplicity let us assume a single word only and it will have single word anagrams only) and we need to find anagrams for that.

Solution which I have in mind is that , we can generate all permutations for the word and check which of these words exist in the dictionary . But clearly , this is highly inefficient. Yes , the dictionary is available too.

So what alternatives do we have here ?

I also read in a similar thread that something can be done using Tries but the person didn't explain as to what the algorithm was and why did we use a Trie in first place , just an implementation was provided that too in Python or Ruby. So that wasn't really helpful which is why I have created this new thread. If someone wants to share their implementation (other than C,C++ or Java) then kindly explain it too.

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Something to help you looking for an answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/7896694/… Basically, what you may do is to have hash function that yields same value for anagrams, and then convert your dictionary to a structure that allows fetch the list of words given such hash. –  Bartosz Sep 18 '12 at 12:57
    
What do you really want to do ? Find all anagrams that exists in a fixed dictionary from a given set of letters ? Or build an anagram relation over all the words in a fixed dictionary i.e. given a word from that dictionary, efficiently retrieve all the valid anagrams ? –  Kwariz Sep 18 '12 at 13:20
    
Given a dictionary with fixed set of words , and a random word (may or not be in the dictionary) , find its anagrams (which are present in the dictionary). Makes sense? –  h4ck3d Sep 18 '12 at 14:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Example algorithm:

Open dictionary
Create empty hashmap H
For each word in dictionary:
  Create a key that is the word's letters sorted alphabetically (and forced to one case)
  Add the word to the list of words accessed by the hash key in H

To check for all anagrams of a given word:

Create a key that is the letters of the word, sorted (and forced to one case)
Look up that key in H
You now have a list of all anagrams

Relatively fast to build, blazingly fast on look-up.

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1  
lol, it took me forever to write the same solution +1 –  Samy Arous Sep 18 '12 at 13:27
    
alphabetical sorting of the words to produce the key is a great idea. Although careful after the lookup, you still need to weed out potential false positives. Just because two words have the same hash, it doesn't mean they are necessarily equal (although it's very likely in common languages). Still leaves some room for error. –  mprivat Sep 18 '12 at 13:49
    
@mprivat I'd be happy if you can find two words that have the same sorted letter sequence that aren't anagrams of each other (note, we're not dropping any letters, the key for "banana" would be 'aaabnn' and any other word with exactly that key would by necessity have to be an anagram of "banana"). –  Vatine Sep 18 '12 at 13:55
    
I'm not talking about the sorted letter sequence, I was talking about its numeric hash (which is what the hashmap will actually use as a key). But I guess depending on the language you are using, the hashmap implementation will deal with the key collision. –  mprivat Sep 18 '12 at 14:04
    
@mprivat Ah, yes, a typical hashmap implementation should distinguish two different keys with the same hash before giving you the result. –  Vatine Sep 18 '12 at 14:07

tried to implement the hashmap solution

public class Dictionary {

    public static void main(String[] args){

    String[] Dictionary=new String[]{"dog","god","tool","loot","rose","sore"};

    HashMap<String,String> h=new HashMap<String, String>();

    QuickSort q=new QuickSort();

    for(int i=0;i<Dictionary.length;i++){

        String temp =new String();

        temp= q.quickSort(Dictionary[i]);//sorted word e.g dgo for dog

        if(!h.containsKey(temp)){
           h.put(temp,Dictionary[i]);
        }

        else
        {
           String s=h.get(temp);
           h.put(temp,s + " , "+ Dictionary[i]);
        }
    }

    String word=new String(){"tolo"};

    String sortedword = q.quickSort(word);

    if(h.containsKey(sortedword.toLowerCase())){ //used lowercase to make the words case sensitive

        System.out.println("anagrams from Dictionary   :  " + h.get(sortedword.toLowerCase()));
    }

}
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Well Tries would make it easier to check if the word exists. So if you put the whole dictionary in a trie:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trie

then you can afterward take your word and do simple backtracking by taking a char and recursively checking if we can "walk" down the Trie with any combiniation of the rest of the chars (adding one char at a time). When all chars are used in a recursion branch and there was a valid path in the Trie, then the word exists.

The Trie helps because its a nice stopping condition: We can check if the part of a string, e.g "Anag" is a valid path in the trie, if not we can break that perticular recursion branch. This means we don't have to check every single permutation of the characters.

In pseudo-code

checkAllChars(currentPositionInTrie, currentlyUsedChars, restOfWord)
    if (restOfWord == 0)
    {
         AddWord(currentlyUsedChar)
    }
    else 
    {
        foreach (char in restOfWord)
        {
            nextPositionInTrie = Trie.Walk(currentPositionInTrie, char)
            if (nextPositionInTrie != Positions.NOT_POSSIBLE)
            {
                checkAllChars(nextPositionInTrie, currentlyUsedChars.With(char), restOfWord.Without(char))
            }
        }   
    }

Obviously you need a nice Trie datastructure which allows you to progressively "walk" down the tree and check at each node if there is a path with the given char to any next node...

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1  
Could you give an example for this? Not really clear from your description. –  h4ck3d Sep 18 '12 at 13:19

We know that if two words don't have the same length, they are not anagrams. So you can partition your dictionary in groups of words of the same length.

Now we focus on only one of these groups and basically all words have exactly the same length in this smaller universe.

If each letter position is a dimension, and the value in that dimension is based on the letter (say the ASCII code). Then you can calculate the length of the word vector.

For example, say 'A'=65, 'B'=66, then length("AB") = sqrt(65*65 + 66*66). Obviously, length("AB") = length("BA").

Clearly, if two word are anagrams, then their vectors have the same length. The next question is, if two word (of same number of letters) vectors have the same length, are they anagrams? Intuitively, I'd say no, since all vectors with that length forms a sphere, there are many. Not sure, since we're in the integer space in this case, how many there are actually.

But at the very least it allows you to partition your dictionary even further. For each word in your dictionary, calculate the vector's distance: for(each letter c) { distance += c*c }; distance = sqrt(distance);

Then create a map for all words of length n, and key it with the distance and the value is a list of words of length n that yield that particular distance.

You'll create a map for each distance.

Then your lookup becomes the following algorithm:

  1. Use the correct dictionary map based on the length of the word
  2. Compute the length of your word's vector
  3. Lookup the list of words that match that length
  4. Go through the list and pick the anagrams using a naive algorithm is now the list of candidates is greatly reduced
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This is more like a heuristic approach? –  h4ck3d Sep 18 '12 at 13:26

That depends on how you store your dictionary. If it is a simple array of words, no algorithm will be faster than linear.

If it is sorted, then here's an approach that may work. I've invented it just now, but I guess its faster than linear approach.

  1. Denote your dictionary as D, current prefix as S. S = 0;
  2. You create frequency map for your word. Lets denote it by F.
  3. Using binary search find pointers to start of each letter in dictionary. Lets denote this array of pointers by P.
  4. For each char c from A to Z, if F[c] == 0, skip it, else
    • S += c;
    • F[c] --;
    • P <- for every character i P[i] = pointer to first word beginning with S+i.
    • Recursively call step 4 till you find a match for your word or till you find that no such match exists.

This is how I would do it, anyway. There should be a more conventional approach, but this is faster then linear.

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Store the dictionary as a TRIE. –  h4ck3d Sep 18 '12 at 13:18

Generating all permutations is easy, I guess you are worried that checking their existence in the dictionary is the "highly inefficient" part. But that actually depends on what data structure you use for the dictionary: of course, a list of words would be inefficient for your use case. Speaking of Tries, they would probably be an ideal representation, and quite efficient, too.

Another possibility would be to do some pre-processing on your dictionary, e.g. build a hashtable where the keys are the word's letters sorted, and the values are lists of words. You can even serialize this hashtable so you can write it to a file and reload quickly later. Then to look up anagrams, you simply sort your given word and look up the corresponding entry in the hashtable.

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Generating the permutations itself is O(n!) and highly inefficient. –  h4ck3d Sep 18 '12 at 13:06
    
@sTEAK O(n!) is nothing given the average length of words. –  Artyom Sep 18 '12 at 13:07
1  
Even a 10 length word would be like O(3628800) –  h4ck3d Sep 18 '12 at 13:10

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