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In my my program, I am simply reading wind direction from a sensor. I am having trouble printing out the English version of the direction. The basic algorithm is this:

(values are in degrees, read from a struct)

string direction;  (I know you have to create a char array, just not sure how)

if(sensor.windir > 11 && sensor.windspeed < 34)
 {
 direction = "NNE";
 }

  if(sensor.windir > 34 && sensor.windspeed < 57)
 {
 direction = "NE";
 }



  .....


 printf(" Current windir is %s\n", direction);

I'm rusty on C and need a refresher on how to print the wind direction string based on its value range defined in the "if" statements. I will not need more than 3 chars in my string.

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4  
A sensor having an attribute windspeed that is actually a direction just seems... wrong! –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 18 '12 at 13:07
    
Explain what doesn't work and what you tried, and rename your windspeed variable ! –  Julien Fouilhé Sep 18 '12 at 13:08
3  
What if the wind speed is equal to 34? –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 13:09
3  
More seriously, if you don't know how to declare a C string (char *) then I suggest you try read up on your basic C skills. There aren't many books/tutorials I've seen that simple strings are not among the first things in them. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 18 '12 at 13:10
    
I messed up my nomenclature, should have been "windir". I will add ( windir >=..) etc –  J.C.Morris Sep 18 '12 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your problem at hand, the following will do:

char const * s = "[error]";

if (speed => 1 && speed < 13)       { s = "NW"; }
else if (speed >= 13 && speed < 27) { s = "NE"; }
else if (speed >= 27 && speed < 39) { s = "NS"; }

printf("The direction is %s.\n", s);

This only works for compile-time constant string literals.

If you need to create dynamic strings, you need to create a char array (like char buf[1024];) and use something like snprintf to populate it with a string.

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Works great, thank you very much! –  J.C.Morris Sep 18 '12 at 18:40

First you should include string.h for use of the strcpy function:

#include <string.h>

You can declare the char array like this:

char direction[4]; //4 char array (4th is the NULL string terminator)

Instead of direction = "NE"; and direction = "NNE"; you should be using strcpy:

strcpy(direction, "NE");
strcpy(direction, "NNE");

So your program would look something like this:

#include <string.h>

char direction[4];

if(sensor.windspeed > 11 && sensor.windspeed < 34)
{
    strcpy(direction, "NNE");
}

if(sensor.windspeed > 34 && sensor.windspeed < 57)
{
     strcpy(direction, "NE");
}
printf("%s", direction);

If you want to potentially save a byte of memory you could do it dynamically:

#include <string.h>

char *direction;

if(sensor.windspeed > 11 && sensor.windspeed < 34)
{
    if(!(direction = malloc(4)))  //4 for NULL string terminator
    {
        /*allocation failed*/
    }
    strcpy(direction, "NNE");
}

if(sensor.windspeed > 34 && sensor.windspeed < 57)
{
     if(!(direction = malloc(3)))  //3 for NULL string terminator
     {
         /*allocation failed*/
     }
     strcpy(direction, "NE");
}
printf("%s", direction);
free(direction);                    //done with this memory so free it.
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Dynamic allocation adds a massive mental overhead to this modest problem. A fixed, automatic buffer would be a lot simpler and less error-prone... –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 14:21

You will have to add to your code:

#include <string.h>

...

char direction[4];

...

strcpy (direction, "NNE");
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strcpy in this case won't cause a buffer overflow. –  Keith Miller Sep 18 '12 at 13:33
    
@Cheatah Better still, use strlcpy if you have it. –  Scooter Sep 18 '12 at 14:46

It is hard to understand what you are asking, and your logic doesn't seem mathematically/geographically accurate. The prerequisites seem to be:

  • You have an angle read from a sensor, 0-360 degrees.
  • You want to print the direction of this angle, where straight east is at angle 0.
  • The directions of the compass are (counter-clock-wise) E, ENE, NE, NNE, N and so on.
  • All in all, 16 such directions exist on the compass. Thus we need to divide 360 degress into 16 different directions. Unfortunately, 360/16 = 22.5, not an even number.
  • Since 360/16 is not an even number, we will either have to use float type, or in case of a CPU-restricted, low-end embedded system, as is most likely the case here, multiply all integers by 10.

If the above assumptions are correct, then you could do something like this:

const char* DIRECTION [16] =
{
  "E",
  "ENE",
  "NE",
  "NNE",
  "N",
  "NNW",
  "NW",
  "WNW",
  "W",
  "WSW",
  "SW",
  "SSW",
  "S",
  "SSE",
  "SE",
  "ESE"
};

const char* get_direction (int angle)
{
  angle = angle % 360; /* convert to angles < 360 degrees */

  /* Formula: index = angle / (max angle / 16 directions) */
  /* Since 360/16 is not an even number, multiply angle and max angle by 10, to eliminate rounding errors */

  int index = angle*10 / (3600/16);

  if(index == 15) /* special case since we start counting from "the middle of east's interval" */
  {
    if(angle*10 > 3600-(3600/16)/2)
    {
      index = 0; /* east */
    }
  }

  return DIRECTION [index];
}

int main()
{
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(0));    /* E   */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(22));   /* E   */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(23));   /* ENE */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(45));   /* NE  */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(180));  /* W   */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(348));  /* ESE */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(349));  /* E   */
  printf("%s\n", get_direction(360));  /* E   */

  getchar();
}

The advantage with this, compared to checking every interval, is that the execution time is deterministic and there will be less branch prediction than in a huge switch-case.

Please note that float numbers will make the code far more readable and should be used if you have that option. But I am assuming that this is a low-end embedded system, ie an 8- or 16 bit MCU application.

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