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I was just going through some C code, when I got stuck upon this piece of code.

void someFunction(Int32 someVariable)
{
    /* someVariable is hard coded to 2 */
    (void)someVariable;

    //some processing that has nothing to do with someVariable.
}

What does the author meant by the comment, "someVariable is hard coded to 2"? What exactly is happening to someVariable?

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The author was probably trying to optimize this function. They happened to know that someVariable would always be 2, so they wrote the function to use that literal value instead of the variable. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 18 '12 at 13:14
    
What it makes someVariable equal to 2? There are no constants involved? @VaughnCato –  Sean Vaughn Sep 18 '12 at 13:17
    
I'm guessing that someFunction is always called with a value of 2. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 18 '12 at 13:18
    
So if I replace the LOC with this line, someVariable = 2, would it make any difference? @VaughnCato –  Sean Vaughn Sep 18 '12 at 13:20
    
No, since someVariable isn't used. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 18 '12 at 13:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It means that the code used to look like this, for example:

// Somewhere else in the source:
…someFunction(2)…
…
…x = 2;…
…someFunction(x)…
…
// Et cetera, the point being that whenever someFunction is called, its argument always has the value 2.

// The definition of someFunction:
void someFunction(Int32 someVariable)
{
    foo(someVariable*3);
    y = someVariable*7 - 4;
    bar(y);
    …
}

and the author changed it to this:

// The definition of someFunction:
void someFunction(Int32 someVariable)
{
    (void) someVariable;
    foo(6);
    y = 10;
    bar(y);
    …
}

So, what happened is:

  • Everywhere that “someVariable” appeared in “someFunction”, the author replaced it with “2”.
  • The author then reduced expressions, so that “someVariable*3” became “2*3” and then became “6”. This explains why you do not see “someVariable” in someFunction and why you do not see “2” in someFunction.

In other words, the code of someFunction now behaves the way the original code behaved when someVariable was 2. You describe the body of someFunction as “some processing that has nothing to do with someVariable”, but, in fact, it is processing that uses 2 for the variable of someVariable. Whatever role someVariable played in the function has been lost by the editing, but, presumably, this code behaves like the old code did, as long as someVariable was 2.

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thanks for such a nice explanation. :) –  Sean Vaughn Sep 18 '12 at 13:39

Most likely this (casting of a function argument to void) is done to shut up the compiler, which otherwise would warn or error out because of the unused argument. Whether the value is "hard-coded" somewhere is irrelevant to the presented code.

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The statement

(void)someVariable;

will disable any compiler warning that the parameter someVariable is unused within the function.

If you look at the succeeding code you will probably find places where it could use the value of someVariable but is instead hard coded to assume that it is 2.

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I went through the rest of the code, but it itn't using someVariable past the (void)someVariable LOC. Does it mean someVariable has been set to 2, meaning someVariable = 2? –  Sean Vaughn Sep 18 '12 at 13:13
    
@SeanVaughn it's assuming that someVariable is 2. –  ecatmur Sep 18 '12 at 13:14
    
Why exactly 2? There is no mentioning of constants. –  Sean Vaughn Sep 18 '12 at 13:15
    
@SeanVaughn that would depend on what the code's doing, and what someVariable is. For example, if it's a power then you would see x*x and sqrt(x) instead of pow(x, 2) and pow(x, 0.5). –  ecatmur Sep 18 '12 at 13:19

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