Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When using a language that has try/catch/finally, are D's failure/success/exit scope statements still useful? D doesn't seem to have finally which may explain why those statements are used in D. But with a language like C# is it useful? I am designing a language so if I see many pros I'll add it in.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have a blog or any kind of site? –  Tim Matthews Aug 8 '09 at 6:19
    
Ctrl Alt D-1337: Nope. You should msg me (my email is in my profile). I might release it under a different name. (I have different usernames for different interest) –  acidzombie24 Aug 8 '09 at 20:30
5  
D does have finally –  BCS Aug 9 '09 at 19:20
    
BCS: D'oh. Good to know. I have read the manual front to back some months ago. I guess that slipped my mind. –  acidzombie24 Aug 9 '09 at 20:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

scope(X) isn't necessary in the same way that for isn't necessary provided you have if and goto.

Here's a paraphrased example from some code I've been writing today:

sqlite3* db;
sqlite3_open("some.db", &db);
scope(exit) sqlite3_close(db);

sqlite3_stmt* stmt;
sqlite3_prepare_v2(db, "SELECT * FROM foo;", &stmt);
scope(exit) sqlite3_finalize(stmt);

// Lots of stuff...

scope(failure) rollback_to(current_state);
make_changes_with(stmt);

// More stuff...

return;

Contrast this to using try/catch:

sqlite3* db;
sqlite3_open("some.db", &db);
try
{
    sqlite3_stmt* stmt;
    sqlite3_prepare_v2(db, "SELECT * FROM foo;", &stmt);
    try
    {
        // Lots of stuff...
        try
        {
            make_changes_with(stmt);

            // More stuff...
        }
        catch( Exception e )
        {
            rollback_to(current_state);
            throw;
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        sqlite3_finalize(stmt);
    }
}
finally
{
    sqlite3_close(db);
}

The code has turned into spaghetti, spreading the error recovery all over the shop and forcing a level of indentation for every try block. The version using scope(X) is, in my opinion, significantly more readable and easier to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
Gold, not only because you should me how it can become spaghetti, but also how the code is so function specific that destuctors should/can not be a solution. –  acidzombie24 Aug 8 '09 at 20:23
    
That first code example is very nice. It's a breath of fresh air. We're all so used to reading the second translated form that the first looks weird, but it has the same confidence and progression that "early return" or "early throw" code does: consider problem A, state the resolution, forget about A and move on to consider problem B, state the resolution, forget about B and move on. –  seh Nov 21 '09 at 22:41

try/catch/finally forces a level of nesting; scope guards don't. Besides, they let you write cleanup code in the same "area" as allocation code, so no more "open file, scroll to end of function, close file, scroll to top of function".

Fundamentally though, it's just a more convenient expression of try/catch/finally exception handling - anything you can do with try/catch/finally you can do with scope guards, and reverse.

Is it worth it? I'm a D fanboy (so, biased), but I'd say definitely.

share|improve this answer

Disclaimer I'm a D fan boy too.

someRiskyFunctionThatMayThrow();
lock();
/* we have definitly got the lock so lets active
a piece of code for exit */
scope(exit)
    freelock();

Compared to:

try
{
    someRiskyFunctionThatMayThrow();
    lock();
}
finally
{
    freeLockIfNotGot();
}
share|improve this answer

It worth to mention that scope(exit), scope(failure) and scope(success) are also available for C++.

Following syntax is supported, case 1:

try
{
    int some_var=1;
    cout << "Case #1: stack unwinding" << endl;
    scope(exit)
    {
        cout << "exit " << some_var << endl;
        ++some_var;
    };
    scope(failure)
    {
        cout << "failure " << some_var  << endl;
        ++some_var;
    };
    scope(success)
    {
        cout << "success " << some_var  << endl;
        ++some_var;
    };
    throw 1;
} catch(int){}

prints:

Case #1: stack unwinding
failure 1
exit 2

Case 2:

{
    int some_var=1;
    cout << "Case #2: normal exit" << endl;
    scope(exit)
    {
        cout << "exit " << some_var << endl;
        ++some_var;
    };
    scope(failure)
    {
        cout << "failure " << some_var << endl;
        ++some_var;
    };
    scope(success)
    {
        cout << "success " << some_var << endl;
        ++some_var;
    };
}

prints:

Case #2: normal exit
success 1
exit 2
share|improve this answer
    
wtf so much code!? I implemented SCOPE_EXIT, SCOPE_SUCCESS and SCOPE_FAIL in 6lines of C++11 code. All I do is pass in a function of lambda. But +1 anyways. No way am i including those headers tho. Very overkill. Heres 3 lines, the other 3 are marco defs specific to my code pastebin.com/zaLZ6fP7 –  acidzombie24 Oct 21 '12 at 4:28
1  
@acidzombie24: 1. Your solution does not work properly, check this: ideone.com/IcWMEf There is no any exception inside ~Test(), but "failure" is printed. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Oct 21 '12 at 11:12
    
@acidzombie24: 2. For C++11-only solution is shorter indeed. But, that library works well for C++98/C++03 too. Most of code is related to emulation of "lambdas" for C++98/C++03. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Oct 21 '12 at 11:13
    
@acidzombie24: 3. Familiarize yourself with Boost.ScopeExit library - boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/libs/scope_exit/doc/html/index.html Note that it works well for C++98/03/11. Check it's code: boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/boost/scope_exit.hpp –  Evgeny Panasyuk Oct 21 '12 at 11:14
    
Nice catch! I didn't use it for production but I would have if i was writing scope specific code :/ –  acidzombie24 Oct 21 '12 at 19:15

Distinguishing failure-exit from success-exit is quite useful some of the time -- I have no real world experience with D, but Python's with statement also allows that, and I find it very useful, for example, to either commit or rollback a DB transaction that was opened in the protected part of the body.

When I explained this then-new Python feature (it's been around for a while now;-) to friends and colleagues who are gurus in C++ and Java I found they immediately understood, and saw the interest in having such a feature (Python does have finally, too, but that's no help in distinguishing success from failure, just like in other languages [or C++'s "RAII destruction of auto variables in the block" equivalent]).

share|improve this answer
    
I dont understand with. I read this effbot.org/zone/python-with-statement.htm It looks like it allows the ctor and dtor to run. Doesnt it run without the statement? i dont know python well or what is actually happening –  acidzombie24 Aug 8 '09 at 4:23
1  
Point is, that the context manager's __exit__ special method is called with information about what exception is being propagated, if any; so, a context manager for DB operations, for example, can distinguish between success cases, warranting a DB commit, and failures, requiring a DB rollback. You're talking about a completely different issue -- dtors, per se, could be run in a try/finally, that's just syntactically clumsier than RAII (look THAT up!-) but functionally equivalent. But distinguishing success from failure, in some cases, is CRUCIAL! –  Alex Martelli Aug 8 '09 at 5:08

@DK, It should be pointed out, in C++ (and Java I think) you could easily use an "anonymous" class to accomplish the same thing as scope(exit):

int some_func() 
{
    class _dbguard { sqlite3* db;
                     _dbguard(const _dbguard&); _dbguard& operator=(const _dbguard&);
                 public:
                     _dbguard(const char* dbname) { sqlite3_open(dbname, &db);}
                     ~_dbguard() {sqlite3_close(db);} 
                     operator sqlite3*() { return db; } 

    } db("dbname");
    ...
}

And if you did this more than once you'd immediately turn it into a full class to handle your RAII for you. It is so simple to write I can't imagine a C++ program that uses sqlite (as used in the example) without creating classes like CSqlite_DB and CSqlite_Stmt. In fact the operator sqlite3*() should be anathama and the full version would just have methods that provide statements:

class CSqlite3_DB {
    ...
    CSqlite3_Stmt Prepare(const std::string& sql) {
        sqlite3_stmt* stmt = 0;
        try {
             sqlite3_prepare_v2(db, sql.c_str(), &stmt);
        } catch (...) {}
        return stmt;
    }
};

As for the original question, I'd say the answer is "not really". Proper respect for DRY would tell you to take those long blocks of try/catch/finally and convert them to separate classes that hide the try/catch parts away from the rest where they can (in the case of scope(failure)) and makes resource management transparent (in the case of scope(exit)).

share|improve this answer
    
excellent answer. –  acidzombie24 Jun 21 '10 at 18:45
1  
... although I will point out, scope(exit) is about 200 less characters than either version :-) –  Tim Keating Oct 13 '10 at 18:28
    
Actually, since writing this I do prefer D's method. When I really thought about scope(failure) and scope(success) I was sold. The RAII way can't duplicate those features without ugly MACRO support. Still, for SqlLite example, a full C++ wrapper class is the "proper" C++ solution. –  jmucchiello Oct 13 '10 at 18:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.