Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

In PHP 5, I can to overload constructors (and any others methods). But if I get some code like this:

class Base {

    public function __construct($a, $b) {
        echo $a+$b;
    }


    public function sayHello() {
        echo 'Hello ';
    }
}


trait SayWorld {

    public function __construct($a, $b, $c = 0) {
        echo (int)$c * ($a+$b);
    }

    public function sayHello($a = null) {
        parent::sayHello();
        echo 'World!'.$a;
    }
}

class MyHelloWorld extends Base {
    use SayWorld;
}

$o = new MyHelloWorld(2, 3);
$o->sayHello(1);

I have an error:

Fatal error:  MyHelloWorld has colliding constructor definitions coming from traits 

How can I to fix it? You can test my code here.

share|improve this question
1  
Just a warning. Trait aliases will cause PHP to crash as of 5.4.7, particularly with autoloaders. A fix has been added to the repo, so hopefully it will show up in the next version. – Matthew Sep 25 '12 at 13:36
up vote 46 down vote accepted

I think for now the only way to do what you want is:

class MyHelloWorld extends Base {

    use SayWorld {
        SayWorld::__construct as private __swConstruct;
    }

    public function __construct($a, $b, $c = 0)
    {
        $this->__swConstruct($a, $b, $c);
    }
}

Edit 2:

My advice, based on over a year of dealing with traits in PHP, is: avoid writing constructors in traits at all, or if you must - at least make them parameterless. Having them in traits goes against the idea of constructors in general, which is: constructors should be specific to a class to which they belong. Other, evolved high-level languages don't even support implicit constructor inheritance. This is because constructors have far more stronger relation to the class then other methods. In fact they have so strong relation, that even the LSP does not apply to them. The traits in Scala language (a very mature and SOLID-friendly successor of Java), can't have a constructor with parameters.

Edit 1:

There was a bug in PHP 5.4.11, which actually allowed to alias a superclass method. But this was considered a no-no by the PHP developers, so we are still stuck with that cumbersome solution which I presented above. But that bug raised a discussion about what can be done with this, and I'm hoping it will be targeted in future releases.

Meanwhile I came across the same problem over and over again. My irritation raised exponentially with the number of parameters and lines of docblock which had to be repeated a lot of times in order to use the trait. So I came up with the following pattern in order to stick to the DRY rule as much as I could:

Instead of repeating entire set of parameters like this:

trait SayWorld {

    /**
     * This is a valid docblock.
     *
     * @param int $a Doc comment.
     * @param int $b Doc comment.
     */
    public function __construct($a, $b) {
        echo (int)$c * ($a+$b);
    }
}

class MyHelloWorld extends Base {

    use SayWorld {
        SayWorld::__construct as private __swConstruct;
    }

    /**
     * Repeated and unnecessary docblock.
     *
     * @param int $a Doc comment.
     * @param int $b Doc comment.
     * @param int $c Doc comment.
     */
    public function __construct($a, $b, $c = 0)
    {
        $this->__swConstruct($a, $b);
    }
}

I write a class much like a tuple (concept familiar to C# and Python users), and use it instead of an endless list of parameters:

class SayWorldConstructTuple
{
    public $a;

    public $b;

    public function __construct($a, $b)
    {
        $this->a = $a;
        $this->b = $b;
    }
}

class MyHelloWorld extends Base {

    use SayWorld {
        SayWorld::__construct as private __swConstruct;
    }

    /**
     * New and valid docblock.
     *
     * @param SayWorldConstructTuple $Tuple
     * @param int $c Additional parameter.
     */
    public function __construct(SayWorldConstructTuple $Tuple, $c = 0)
    {
        $this->__swConstruct($Tuple->a, $Tuple->b);
        $this->c = $c;
    }
}

Note: this pattern is of course more useful with a larger amount of tuple's constructor parameters, and more classes using the tuple.

It can be automated further with the use of PHP's dynamic nature.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1 for avoid writing constructors in traits at all with explanation – Dennis May 27 '14 at 21:43

Try:

use SayWorld {
  Base::__construct insteadof SayWorld;
}

Ref: PHP Docs

share|improve this answer
    
nods, nice +1 – wesside Sep 18 '12 at 13:40
    
I tried it. Did you tried to run your own code? It returns MyHelloWorld has colliding constructor definitions coming from traits fatal error anyway. – Guy Fawkes Sep 18 '12 at 13:46
    
Sorry, my mistake was confident I had it the right way around ;)... Fixed! – Martin Sep 18 '12 at 13:53
1  
After fix, your answer returns logic to the state when no traits were used. – Guy Fawkes Sep 18 '12 at 13:55
    
How does this one perform? I used a legacy constructor instead as it didn't seem to throw a collision.. pastebin.com/zHktB5C0 – Martin Sep 18 '12 at 13:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.