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I've got a simple script:

#!/bin/sh
cd /tmp/pics
for pic in *.jpg;
do
  php -f /tmp/pics/covert.php $pic;
done

When my pictures have white-space in their names that script won't work. How could I fix that?

How can I fix my script to handle whitespace properly, and also handle other JPEG extensions, such as "JPG", "JPEG", "jpeg"?

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1  
Try speech marks around the "$pic". –  Orbling Sep 18 '12 at 14:01
    
Add quotes around, when having trouble with white space –  David 10K Sep 18 '12 at 14:01
    
No need for the semicolons here. –  Jens Sep 18 '12 at 14:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Quoting rules in bash and other shells are unlike those in "normal" scripting languages like Ruby and Python and Perl, so this may be confusing at first, but if you put double quotes around $pic, bash will treat the contents of the variable properly even if it contains spaces.

That one fix would make your script look like this

#!/bin/sh
cd /tmp/pics
for pic in *.jpg;
do
  php -f /tmp/pics/covert.php "$pic";
done

I would also remove the semi-colons at the end of each line. Those are only needed if you're cramming multiple lines together on one line. They're not needed in bash the way they are in PHP or (to a lesser extent) JavaScript.

As written, this is using the Bourne shell instead of bash. (For the moment we'll ignore the fact that bash might be used on your system to emulate the Bourne shell.) Change the "shebang" line at the top if you want to use bash. Typically it is #!/bin/bash.

To handle multiple file extensions, you can just stack them up next to each other with spaces in between, like this

for pic in *.jpg *.jpeg *.JPEG *.JPG

As Jens points out, you might have odd corner-cases where the file extension is mixed case. You can handle that with brackets to group characters

for pic in *.[jJ][pP][gG] *.[jJ][pP][eE][gG]

or you could use glenn's approach of setting your shell options to ignore case (and non-matching patterns) and then use a simpler glob pattern

shopt -s nocaseglob nullglob
for pic in *.jpg *.jpeg

If we take that latter approach, the final script would look like this:

#!/bin/bash
cd /tmp/pics
shopt -s nocaseglob nullglob
for pic in *.jpg *.jpeg
do
  php -f /tmp/pics/covert.php "$pic"
done

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Double quotes, btw. Single quotes won't work for parameter substitutions. –  Jens Sep 18 '12 at 14:06
1  
It's similar in PHP, as it doesn't treat them as literals when quoted. But you're right, you were only talking about normal scripting languages. :) –  lynxlynxlynx Sep 18 '12 at 14:07
    
@Jens: yes, I should clarify that. In (non-computer-related) American English "quotation marks" means double-quotes, but I think it might be the opposite in British English, and therefore most of the English-speaking world... will fix... –  iconoclast Sep 18 '12 at 14:09
    
BTW, your point about restoring the working directory is only an issue if the script is sourced, i.e. using . script or source script. Directly executing the script (./script - which is why you'd add a shebang line), runs the script in a separate process so the script cannot cause side effects in the parent environment, like changing the current directory or environment variables. A good reason to avoid sourcing scripts. –  Ned Deily Sep 18 '12 at 14:21
    
@NedDeily: ahh.... you're right. I've gotten in that habit because I do a lot of sourcing from my .bash_profile and .zshrc, so I can keep things in nice focused files rather than a bazillion lines in one big "ball of mud" file, but I guess it's not normally important. –  iconoclast Sep 18 '12 at 14:25

For short scripts like this I would use

#!/bin/sh
cd /tmp/pics
for pic in *.[jJ][pP][gG] *.[jJ][pP][eE][gG]; do
  php -f /tmp/pics/covert.php "$pic"
done

This handles even weird camelcasing extensions like prettygirl.JpeG :-)

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With bash, to do case-insensitive file matching:

shopt -s nocaseglob nullglob
for pic in *{jpg,jpeg}
do
    php5 -f ./convert.php "$pic"
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's working! –  SubZeroFX Sep 19 '12 at 12:05

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