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I'd like to make a circular button (div works too) and put it in the centre with a diameter of 20% of the height of the window. This I can do, but the button will become oval if the window isn't exactly square (I'd like the width and height to be the same - a perfect circle).

.circle {
  height: 20%;
  width: 20%;
  border-radius: 100%;
  font-size: 20px;
  color: #fff;
  line-height: 100px;
  text-align: center;
  background: #000
}

Hardcoding a pixel value isn't much of an option as it wouldn't resize based on the window. Any ideas?

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1  
Well, there isn't such thing as 20% of the window if you don't want it to become oval. It's either 20% of the width or 20% of the height. –  Chris Sep 18 '12 at 14:17
    
Edited my question. I would like 20% of the height. –  Andrew Sep 18 '12 at 14:21
    
What type of element is your circle? img? div? –  Armel Larcier Sep 18 '12 at 14:24
    
Edited my question. It's a div. It could also be a button. –  Andrew Sep 18 '12 at 14:26
    
you could add a square blank image inside and use it to stretch your div. With your div absolutely positionned, you'll be able to set the img's height accoringly to window's height. –  Armel Larcier Sep 18 '12 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are two ways to achive this; with and without JavaScript.

The JavaScript method

Here's a simple demo: little link.

HTML:

<div class = "circle"></div>

CSS:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}
.circle {
    border-radius: 1000px;
    background-color: rgb(0, 162, 232);
}

JavaScript (uses jQuery, but it isn't necessary):

function upd() {
    var h = $("body").height();
    $(".circle").height(h / 5);
    $(".circle").width(h / 5);
}
upd();
window.onresize = upd;

The non-JavaScript (CSS) method

For a CSS-only solution, you need to use the fact that all padding values are calculated relative to the element parent's width, not height (reference). Little demo: little link.

HTML:

<div class = "wrapper">
    <div class = "main">

    </div>
</div>

CSS:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;    
}
.wrapper {
    width: 20%;
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative;
}
.wrapper:after {
    padding-top: 100%; /*1:1 ratio*/
    display: block;
    content: '';
}
.main {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0; left: 0; /*fill parent*/
    border-radius: 1000px;
    background-color: rgb(0, 162, 232);
    /*I wanted it to look good :)*/
    font-family: 'Arial', Helvetica, Sans-Serif;
    color: white;
}
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Assuming I can guarantee that w/e browser sees this will support calc(), how can I do it with pure CSS? As far as I can tell (I just googled it) calc() only does arithmetic and can't get the page dimensions. –  Andrew Sep 18 '12 at 14:34
1  
@Andrew I was wrong :( Updated answer with a method similar to Dpolehonski's. –  Chris Sep 18 '12 at 14:44

There is a way to achieve a perfect circle without using any JS, it lies in the specifications definition for padding percentage. When the padding is applied as a percentage it is applied as a percentage of the objects width, which means if you set width and height to 0, and give the object a padding of 20% you'll end up with a circle occupying 20% of the available width. You'll need to get creative to get things inside the circle though.

<style>
    html, body {
        width:80%;
    }
    .square
    {
        width:0%;
        height:0%;
        padding:20%;
        position:relative;
        left:25%;/*Position central*/
        border-radius:100%;
        margin:auto;/*Position central*/
        border:1px solid #000000;   
    }
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, although it doesn't lie in the specification. –  Chris Sep 18 '12 at 14:39
    
Actually, you'll need a padding of 10% to emulate a width/ height of 20%. But the idea is is good and there are no worries about support in this case. –  Ana Sep 18 '12 at 14:43
    
@Ana Hmm. I had to use :after pseudo-elements, actually. –  Chris Sep 18 '12 at 14:45
1  
Note: This will only work to make the circle 20% of width, since the padding is calculated relatively to width. –  Chris Sep 18 '12 at 14:48
1  
@Abody97 It doesn't matter. Every browser that supports border-radius, which is essential here, also supports pseudo-elements. –  Ana Sep 18 '12 at 14:48

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