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Is there a way to access a parameter that was passed into a method by the variable name of the parameter?

btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    SortedList<int, string> paygrades = new SortedList<int, string>();
    populatePaygrades(paygrades, sqlconnection);
    doStuffWithLists(paygrades);
}

protected void doStuffWithLists(params SortedList<int,string>[] lists)
{
 doStuffWithSubList(lists.paygrades) //??? how can I access it similar to this?
}

Thanks in advance for any assistance you may be able to provide.

share|improve this question
4  
This makes no sense to me. Try describing what you are trying to accomplish? – codesparkle Sep 18 '12 at 14:12
    
@codesparkle I'm trying to access the list "paygrades" by name rather than by index **by variable name – wes Sep 18 '12 at 14:14
    
if you're passing just one single parameter to doStuffWithLists you can omit the params keyword and access lists with doStuffWithSubList(lists) ? is this what you want ? – Nasreddine Sep 18 '12 at 14:16
1  
params doesn't compile in this context anyway. – codesparkle Sep 18 '12 at 14:16
1  
Then you can extend the list class to give each single list a name field and search by name in doStuffWithLists – Gabber Sep 18 '12 at 14:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not possible, the paygrades name is local in the btn_click function. Unless the SortedList doesn't contain a field called paygrades (and I assure you it doesn't), you won't accomplish anything.

If you want to access the sublist by name you can extend the SortedList adding a name field and searching the first one by name.

Extending SortedList:

class MySortedList: SortedList {
    private string name;
    public string Name{
        get { return this.name; }
        set { this.name=value; }
    }

    //you then need to wrap all the constructors you need from SortedList
}

Using this in your code

protected void doStuffWithLists(params MySortedList<int,string>[] lists){
    foreach(MySortedList l in lists){
        if(l.Name == "paygrades")
             doStuffWithSubList(l);
}
share|improve this answer
    
How would I go about extending the sortedList to contain a name field so that I may access it by name? This is by far the closest answer – wes Sep 18 '12 at 14:41
    
@wes are you calling doStuffWithLists from more than one place in your program? – Mr.Mindor Sep 18 '12 at 14:55
    
@Mr.Mindor I'm not currently calling it in more than one location. Mainly, I'm using it to separate code. – wes Sep 18 '12 at 15:02
    
That doesn't look like valid C#, perhaps it's Java? The question seems to indicate that C# is desired. – Chris Dunaway Sep 18 '12 at 15:14
    
@ChrisDunaway Silly me, this is totally Java!!!! i'll correct right now, thanks – Gabber Sep 18 '12 at 15:21

No you cannot. The name of the variable passed to your method is not available within the method.

Edit: based on your comments elsewhere, I clearly had the wrong impression of what you were trying to do. Instead of augmenting the SortedList with a name, you could pass a dictionary.

    public void CallsDoStuffWithLists()
    {
        SortedList<int, string> theFirstList = new SortedList<int, string>();
        SortedList<int, string> aSecondList = new SortedList<int, string>();
        SortedList<int, string> thirdList = new SortedList<int, string>();
        SortedList<int, string> theLastList = new SortedList<int, string>();

        PopulateTheFirstList(theFirstList);
        PopulateTheSecondList(aSecondList);
        //etc
        // call do stuff with lists.
        DoStuffWithLists(new Dictionary<string, SortedList<int, string>>{{"theFirstList", theFirstList}, {"aSecondList",aSecondList}, {"thirdList", thirdList}, {"theLastList", theLastList}});
     }

    public void DoStuffWithLists(Dictionary<string, SortedList<int,string>> lists)
    {
        // does not loop through all, 
        // does not throw exceptions..
        // if there is a list that was misnamed, it will not be handled.
        SortedList<int, string> temp;
        if(lists.TryGetValue("theFirstList", out temp)) DoStuffWithSubList(temp);
        if(lists.TryGetValue("aSecondList", out temp)) DoStuffWithSubList(temp);



        // loops through each and acts on them accordingly.
        // if DoStuffWithLists is 
        foreach (var list in lists)
        {
            //or use switch statement.
            if(list.Key == "theFirstList")
            {
                DoStuffWithSubList(list.Value);
            }
            else if(list.Key == "aSecondList")
            {
                DoOtherStuffWithSublist(list.Value);
            }
            //etc...
            else
            {
                //we got an unexpected list, what do we do with it?
            }
        }

On a side note: Although I've shown you how you can do what you want, that doesn't mean it is a good idea. In this case it seems you are adding complexity without any gain. You have much more complex and error prone code, and though you are separating the data retrieval from the data processing per list, you are combining the dataprocessing for all the lists.

Have you considered having DoStuffWithLists actually do the data retreival also? far less error prone, No need to match up names.

btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)                           
{                           

    DoStuffWithLists();                           
}    
public void DoStuffWithLists()
{
    //this is far simpler and less error prone.
    SortedList<int, string> theFirstList = new SortedList<int, string>();
    PopulateTheFirstList(theFirstList);
    DoStuffWithSubList(theFirstList);

    SortedList<int, string> aSecondList = new SortedList<int, string>();
    PopulateTheSecondList(aSecondList);
    DoOtherStuffWithSublist(aSecondList);

}

Or better still having a method for handling each List completely and call that instead...

btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)                           
{   
    //this is simpler yet, separates the concerns of each type of list.                        
    HandlePayGrade();                  
    HandleSecondList();
    HandleThirdList();
}   
public void HandlePayGrade()
{
    // you are still separating your data access and processing concerns here.
    SortedList<int, string> paygrades = new SortedList<int, string>();                               
    populatePaygrades(paygrades, sqlconnection);       
    DoStuffWithPaygrades(paygrades);
}

Edit: Original answer below-- Based on how you have stuff named (lists), it looks as though you are expecting all the lists passed into doStuffWithLists to be handled simultaneously. This is not the case, each time it is called it deals with the one list that was passed.

An Example using integers...

//Double an int is invoked 3 times, each time dealing with one integer.
public int DoubleAnInt(int x)
{
    return x+x;   
}

public void CallsDoubleAnInt()
{
    int a = 1;
    int b = DoubleAnInt(a);

    int c = DoubleAnInt(b);
    int d = DoubleAnInt(c);
}

Also Looks like you are trying to get doStuffWithLists to behave differently depending on where it was called from. In this case you just want different methods.

protected void doStuffWithPaygradeLists(SortedList<int,string> list)
{
    ...
}

protected void doStuffWithSomeOtherLists(SortedList<int,string> list)
{
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your updated answer is very good. What I ended up doing is actually setting up an enum loosely based on the answers provided to remove the complexity of using strings. Thanks for your help +1. – wes Sep 18 '12 at 16:59

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