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The problem is: there are two threads, one is a writer to a List another is a reader from the List. Sometimes reader gets stuck if loop in the writer has large amount of iterations. That reader in that case becomes Blocked (not Waiting), which means that it received notification, but writer did not released monitor?

So, why so? What is the best to do with this? (is sleep fine?)

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

public class Main {

    private List<Object> m_calls =  new LinkedList<Object>();

    public void startAll(){

        Thread reader = new Thread(new Runnable() {           
            @Override
            public void run() {
                while(true){
                    synchronized(m_calls){
                        while (m_calls.size() == 0) {
                            try {
                                System.out.println("wait");
                                m_calls.wait();
                            } catch (InterruptedException e) {                               
                                return;
                            }
                        }
                        m_calls.remove(0);
                        System.out.println("remove first");
                    }
                }
            }
        });

        Thread writer = new Thread(new Runnable() {           
            @Override
            public void run() {

                for(int i = 0; i < 15; i++){

                    // UN-comment to have more consistent behavior
                    /*try {
                        Thread.sleep(1);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }*/
                    synchronized(m_calls){
                        m_calls.add(new Object());
                        m_calls.notifyAll();
                        System.out.println("sent");
                    }
                }
            }
        });

        reader.start();
        writer.start();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {     
        new Main().startAll();       
    } 
}

Running of the code above gives different results:

---------------------------------- 1st attempt

wait
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
wait

---------------------------------- 2nd attempt

wait
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
wait
sent
sent
remove first
remove first
wait
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
sent
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
remove first
wait

------------------------------ Uncommented sleep() - works us expected

wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait
sent
remove first
wait

Edit 1: The reader thread (one of them) seems to be not waiting any more, rather it's blocked, which looks like its monitor received notification (after notifyAll()) but writer thread do not release lock in its loop, what is confusing...

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
What is the problem? It appears to behaving correctly in all three cases. In the first case the sending thread finishes before the second thread starts. A thread can add 15 tasks in far less time than it takes to start a thread. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 18 '12 at 14:29
    
The problem actually appeared in production: reader is blocked for several minutes in some cases (e.g. if writer loop quite big). Health monitor then think there is a intercommunication problem, as writer basically is a notification consumer from a remove service. –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 14:34
    
I would assume in you rproduction code that your synchronized block is too coarse (your code shows new Object() in the writer as inside the synchronized block - if its the same in production code, each creation of the object blocks everything. Same with processing in the reader. The code structure suggests you process the object inside the synchronized block. –  Durandal Sep 18 '12 at 14:40
    
I wouldn't use wait/notify in production, I would use the concurrency library if you have Java 1.4 (with the back port library) or 5.0 (built in) or later. IMHO wait/notify is usually needed to answer old interview questions. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 18 '12 at 14:43
    
@Durandal The real implementation is a bit different, there is no object creation inside the loop, and loop do not have constant number of iteration etc. The code above is a model for a real system. Though the real system log output looks pretty same as for the model. –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 14:50
show 2 more comments

3 Answers

Your particular situation would be better done using a BlockingQueue. Blocking queues will block the take thread (the reader) until something is put in the queue (by a writer).

Here's your modified code using a blocking queue:

public class Main {

    private BlockingQueue<Object> m_calls =  new LinkedBlockingQueue<Object>();

    public void startAll(){

        Thread reader = new Thread(new Runnable() {           
            @Override
            public void run() {
                while(!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
                    try {
                        Object obj = m_calls.take();
                        System.out.println("obj taken");
                    } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
                        // Let end
                    }
                }
            }
        });

        Thread writer = new Thread(new Runnable() {           
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    for(int i = 0; i < 15; i++){
                        m_calls.put(new Object());
                        System.out.println("obj put");
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    // Let end
                }
            }
        });

        reader.start();
        writer.start();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {     
        new Main().startAll();       
    }
}

The output:

obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken
obj put
obj taken

This will be much safer than a) using a plain LinkedList and b) trying to use your own wait/notify. Your wait/notify was also pretty vulnerable to race conditions. If the writer thread called notify before the reader called wait, then the reader could wait indefinitely on the last entry.

I might also add that this solution is safe for multiple reader and writer threads. Multiple threads can put and take all at the same time, and the LinkedBlockingQueue will handle the concurrency for you.

The only thing to be careful about is if Object accesses some shared resource, but this is another problem that's related to concurrent access of a group of objects. (Along the lines of "can I access obj1 and obj2 at the same time from two different threads?") This is another problem entirely, so I won't detail a solution here.

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Its worth nothing that nothing happens immediately and when it comes to threads, you cannot be sure when independent events happen. (Which one of the reasons synchronisation is required)

final long start = System.nanoTime();
new Thread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.printf("Took %,d ns to start this thread%n", System.nanoTime() - start);
    }
}).start();

prints

Took 2,807,336 ns to start this thread

This might not sounds like a long time, but at 3.2 GHz this is almost 9 million clock cycle. A computer can do an awful lot in that time. In your case, a short lived thread can run to completion before the second thread even starts.

In the second case, what you are seeing is that locking is not fair (i.e. fair means the one waiting the longest gets the lock first) The reason for this is it is much slower to implement this properly e.g. 10x slower or more. For this reason, a lock tends to be given the the thread which has it last as this is far more efficient in most cases. You can get fair locks using Lock lock = new ReentrantLock(true); but this is generally not used unless required as it is slower for little gain most of the time.

You can try -XX:-UseBiasedLocking to make locking slightly fairer.


To do much the same thing with ExecutorService you can code it like

ExecutorService service = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
// writer
for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++) {
    service.submit(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // reader
            System.out.println("remove first");
        }
    });
    System.out.println("sent");
}
service.submit(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("wait");
    }
});
service.shutdown();

prints

sent
remove first
sent
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
sent
remove first
remove first
wait
share|improve this answer
    
The interesting thing: the issue is quite often reproducible if the app is profiling (using JProfiler). I've got it almost each time. Without profiler the app may run for months. (Note: the issues with profiler apperared only if 'Allocation is recorded') –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 14:56
    
That suggests you have a race condition bug which is more likely to occur when your code is slowed a particular way. The bug is there never the less, it just might not show all the time. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 18 '12 at 14:59
    
One hacky work around is to set a timeout on the wait() e.g. .wait(1000); which means it will never wait more than 1 second even if a notify has been "lost". You shouldn't need to do this but.... –  Peter Lawrey Sep 18 '12 at 15:00
    
I'm not sure, if my vision is right, but the reader is not in waiting state, which means, as I understand, that it was notified. But may be you aright, as I have with wait(10): wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait sent remove first wait wait –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 15:25
    
If you notify but there is no thread waiting, nothing happens. If you later wait(), it could wait forever. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 18 '12 at 15:28
show 2 more comments

A better way to synchronize in such szenarios is to use java.util.concurrent.* in your case perhaps a CountDownLatch.

Maybe try this first before looking for a reason for the deadlock.

EDIT: And Peter is right. It seems to be running ok?

EDIT 2: OK, whole different story after the additional info. I suggest you work with timeouts to force at least one try in reading even if there is more to write after a certain timespan. wait even has a version with timeout ... http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#wait(long)

But again: personally I'd prefer using the concurrancy API.

share|improve this answer
    
Using the concurrency library is a good suggestion, I don't see any deadlock here though. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 18 '12 at 14:32
    
Yep, it does not look like a deadlock, though reader is monitored by external process, and if there was not "reading" for 50 secs - system think there is a problem. The issues is very difficult to reproduce and occurred once in several months or so.. –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 14:40
    
Not a deadlock, no, but it is thread starvation. –  Brian Sep 18 '12 at 14:41
    
"force at least one try in reading even if there is more to write after a certain timespan" I've been thinking about this, but it seems that the problem not in this, I mean waiting thread (reader) seems to be notified, but remains blocked by writer (as on the screenshot from Jprofiler) –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 15:12
    
I've tried wait(10) - it really helped. Now reader reads despite writer writes. –  aillusions Sep 18 '12 at 15:27
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