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I have a file of 2000 rows and 1 column

1007_s_at1
1007_s_at2
1007_s_at3
1007_s_at4
1007_s_at5
1007_s_at6
1007_s_at7
1007_s_at8
1007_s_at9
1007_s_at10

looks like above, I want to remove the last numeric value after "at". In principle whatever number is in the last should be truncated.

I have tried things like splitting them and then rejoioning it, but it just complicates the problem and I am far away from answer.

Could you please suggest something in bash or shell or python or perl to solve this.

An output like below is desired

   1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at
    1007_s_at

Thank you

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1  
This is a trivial problem for regular expressions. What have you tried? –  Mark Ransom Sep 18 '12 at 15:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
sed -i -e 's/[[:digit:]]*$//' filename
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Hi! What is the difference with g and without g.sed -i -e 's/[[:digit:]]*$//g' filename Thank you –  Angelo Sep 18 '12 at 15:16
1  
g means "global" which means that it will apply the substitution for as many times as the pattern matches. Because I am using an anchor ($) the flag is meaningless and I removed it. –  Sean Bright Sep 18 '12 at 15:28
    
Thanks for explaining it. :) –  Angelo Sep 18 '12 at 15:31

With Perl:

perl -p -e "s/\d+$//" input.txt > output.txt
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Just pass string.digits to .rstrip() to remove digits from the right-hand side of your strings:

import string
with open('inputfile') as infile, open('outputfile') as outfile:
    for line in infile:
        outfile.write(line.rstrip().rstrip(string.digits) + '\n')
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If the only the number at the end changes you could potentially splice:

>>> a = '1007_s_at1'
>>> a[0:9]
'1007_s_at'
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Python

Just strip all digits from the end.

>>> "1007_s_at10".rstrip('01234567890')
'1007_s_at'
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If you are using Linux or Unix a simple one liner solution would be:

perl -i.bak -pe 's/\d+$//g' file.txt

if Windows:

perl -i.bak -pe "s/\d+$//g" file.txt

If you already know what it is doing then well and good otherwise, in very simple terms, -i switch with .bak would first create a backup of your file.txt and name it file.txt.bak.

The -p option would then loop over the entries in the file and print/save the output in file.txt after s/\d+$//g removes the digits in the end.

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Nobody's suggested a bash solution yet:

shopt -s extglob
while read line; do
    echo "${line%%*([0-9])}"
done < filename
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