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I have if/then statements that describe a tree. For example:

node1: if VAR1 < X node = 2 else node = 3
node2: if VAR2 < Y node = 4 else node = 5
node3: terminal value = Z
...

The inequalities are always expressed as less than "<". The rules are not necessarily in order of tree depth.

Ignoring the work to parse the statements, what's the easiest way to build/visualize a tree in R? Is there an object/function/package I can call once per rule to iteratively build-up the tree and then call plot()?

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Have you looked at the party package? –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Sep 18 '12 at 16:21
    
Not yet..thanks for the pointer! –  SFun28 Sep 18 '12 at 18:27
    
I do not think you can derive a unique tree without some ordering of the rules. –  BondedDust Sep 18 '12 at 20:04
    
@DWin - I don't think ordering matters. Each line specifies a node and if not a terminal node then it specifies its left and right child. You can imagine randomizing the lines and then drawing each node/connection in the order it appears in the randomized list. The same tree would result regardless of order (although it would look pretty ugly) –  SFun28 Sep 18 '12 at 21:10
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2 Answers

Expanding from the comment I gave earlier, this is the top of the example of plot.BinaryTree in the party package:

   set.seed(290875)

   airq <- subset(airquality, !is.na(Ozone))
   airct <- ctree(Ozone ~ ., data = airq)

   ### regression: boxplots in each node
   plot(airct, terminal_panel = node_boxplot, drop_terminal = TRUE)

and it generates the following graph based on the ctree command above:

enter image description here

The package has two pretty decent vignettes which should get you started.

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thanks, Dirk! The visuals in this package are nice. –  SFun28 Sep 19 '12 at 2:03
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I tried digging down into the code for pkg:party methods but could not follow the dependencies very effectively. I thought looking at the rpart package code might be easier. (Edit: Further thought would be to look at the igraph package.)

require(rpart)
fit <- rpart(Kyphosis ~ Age + Number + Start, data=kyphosis)
print(fit)
#------------
n= 81 

node), split, n, loss, yval, (yprob)
      * denotes terminal node

 1) root 81 17 absent (0.79012346 0.20987654)  
   2) Start>=8.5 62  6 absent (0.90322581 0.09677419)  
     4) Start>=14.5 29  0 absent (1.00000000 0.00000000) *
     5) Start< 14.5 33  6 absent (0.81818182 0.18181818)  
      10) Age< 55 12  0 absent (1.00000000 0.00000000) *
      11) Age>=55 21  6 absent (0.71428571 0.28571429)  
        22) Age>=111 14  2 absent (0.85714286 0.14285714) *
        23) Age< 111 7  3 present (0.42857143 0.57142857) *
   3) Start< 8.5 19  8 present (0.42105263 0.57894737) *
#---code resumes ------
plot(fit)

enter image description here

rpart:::plot.rpart   # will show the code  ... depends on rpart::rpconvert
rpart::rpconvert
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thanks! I had the same idea to deconstruct what rpart does, but thought there might be an easier way. –  SFun28 Sep 18 '12 at 21:05
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