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Possible Duplicate:
C# int ToString format on 2 char int?

Sorry for the simplicity, but this one is eluding me. Pretty much I have a list of 36 records, and if the id is less than 10, I need it to return 01, 02, 03... 09, instead of 1, 2, 3... 9.

Here is the code I have so far and I would have thought this would work. This is C# .NET:

for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
{
    if (i.ToString().Length == 1)
    {
        i.ToString().PadLeft(2,'0');
    }

    Response.Write("Test: " + i);
}

Any help would be appreciated, thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Nick, hometoast, Brian Rasmussen, crashmstr, skolima Sep 18 '12 at 15:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Close, but you're just throwing the result away. – harold Sep 18 '12 at 15:47
    
See, I don't like closing this while becaues the question was about the padding, the issue the OP was having had nothing to do with that, ironically he was doing that correct, he just wasn't assigning the value properly. – CaffGeek Sep 18 '12 at 16:01
    
@CaffGeek the problem is no one with the same problem will ever see the right answer because the question is not asking right thing. It probably could get salvaged to reask the proper question, but then you potentially invalidate at least 1 answer that didn't address the OP's real problem – psubsee2003 Sep 18 '12 at 16:09
    
Why was my question closed? I was asking for help with my issue, not asking how to do it. – Peter Sep 18 '12 at 18:42
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your problem is i is still an integer, it needs to be assigned to a string

  for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
    {
        var iString = i.ToString();

        if(iString.Length == 1)
        {
            iString = iString.PadLeft(2,'0'); //RIGHT HERE!!!
        }
        Response.Write("Test: " + iString);
    }

However, much of this code is superflous, the if statement is not needed. Pad will only ped with zeroes up to the length (2) given. If it's already 2 or more characters long, it won't pad anything. All you need is this

    for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
    {
        var iString = i.ToString().PadLeft(2,'0');
        Response.Write("Test: " + iString);
    }

For that matter, the variable is no longer needed.

    for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
    {
        Response.Write("Test: " + i.ToString().PadLeft(2,'0'));
    }

And if you'll be padding with zeroes all the time, and not some other character, you could just do this

    for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
    {
        Response.Write("Test: " + i.ToString("00"));
    }

And you should get into the habit of using string.Format

    for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
    {
        Response.Write(string.Format("Test: {0}", i.ToString("00")));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
...I refactor a lot... – CaffGeek Sep 18 '12 at 15:56
3  
A downvote? You've got to be kidding me. – CaffGeek Sep 18 '12 at 16:00
    
+1 -nice excercise in answer plus refactor. also agree that the downvoter must be smoking something... jeez!! – jim tollan Jul 8 '13 at 21:00

You don't need IF, use ToString

int i = 5;

i.ToString("00"); //returns 05
share|improve this answer

You can try with

var list = new List<string>();
for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
{
    var result = string.Empty; 
    if(i < 10)
    {
         result = string.Format("0{0}", i);
    }
    else
    {
        result = i.ToString();
    }
    list.Add(result);
}

Nota : Concat your values nefore call Response.Redirect

share|improve this answer
    
Why not do this: if(i < 10) – Tony The Lion Sep 18 '12 at 15:48
    
Response.Redirect??? what are you talking about – CaffGeek Sep 18 '12 at 15:50
    
@Tony Yes i added this condition (i<10) – Aghilas Yakoub Sep 18 '12 at 15:50
    
just concat his values before call Response.Redirect – Aghilas Yakoub Sep 18 '12 at 15:51

You needn't check i.ToString().Length == 1:

for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)    
    Response.Write("Test: " + i.ToString().PadLeft(2,'0')); 

Look to PadLeft in MSDN for clarification. Common signature:

public string PadLeft(int totalWidth, char paddingChar)

Also you can use String.Format:

for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)    
    Response.Write("Test: " + i.ToString("00")); 

Another way - use LINQ:

foreach (var number in Enumerable.Range(1, 36).Select(i => i.ToString("00")))
  Response.Write("Test: " + number);
share|improve this answer

You're simply converting i to string and throwing away the result. In Response.Write("Test: " + i); you're printing i instead of its conversion to string. Try:

for (int i = 1; i <= 36; i++)
{
    if (i.ToString().Length == 1)
    {
           Response.Write(i.ToString().PadLeft(2,'0'));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You are not doing anything with the following line:

i.ToString().PadLeft(2,'0');

i is still just an integer, and its string representation is not going to have a 0 in front of it when you use it later. You would need to save a string of the value to print later.

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