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I have 2D numpy arrays and a center with some coordinates (i, j) (coordinates mean row and column). I need to sum up all array elements at the same distance from the center (simple euklidean distance) for each possible distance from 0 to the edge of the image, i.e. result is an 1D array where the 0th element gives the sum of pixels in distance 0 from center (i.e. just the center), 1st element is the sum of all pixels at distance 1 pixel and so on.

My feeling is that this should be possible to do without a for loop, but unfortunately I don't know enough matrix python tricks to figure this out.

Thank you very much!

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so is each array point a value on a grid which also has an x and y value associated with it? –  mgilson Sep 18 '12 at 15:52
    
Avoiding loops just for the sake of doing so can cause a lot of suffering. Loops can be right and fine (comprehensions are better, considering python) as long as they are sanely used, which is the case more than often. Even so, I do believe that you can avoid SOME inefficient loops to achieve your goal with readable, straightforward code. –  heltonbiker Sep 18 '12 at 19:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use np.bincount...

a = np.random.random((20, 22))

def distance(array, xpos, ypos):
    # probably a gazillion methods to create the actual distances...
    # if you array is large and you are only interested to a certain size
    # you sould probably slice out a smaller one first of course.
    dists = np.sqrt(np.arange(-xpos, array.shape [0]-xpos, dtype=float)[:,None]**2
          + np.arange(-ypos, array.shape [1]-ypos, dtype=float)[None,:]**2)
    return dists

# Prepare which bins to use:
dists = distance(a, 10, 11).astype(int)

# Do a bincount with weights.
result = np.bincount(dists.flat, weights=a.flat)
# and add them up:
result = np.add.accumulate(result)

And result is an array with result[distance] giving sum over all values with smaller or equal distances.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought of that, also, surely a useful trick! +1 –  heltonbiker Sep 18 '12 at 19:18
    
Thanks! I just returned to this problem after and this works great! –  user673592 Oct 12 '12 at 14:05

I'm not sure if this is what you want, but it may be helpful:

import numpy as np
#create data arrays to work with.
x = np.arange(10)
y = np.arange(10)
v = np.arange(100).reshape(10,10) 
#indices of the "center" of the grid
i,j = 5,5 

#Now calculated the distance of each point to the center point on the grid
#Note that `None` is the same as `np.newaxis`
r = np.sqrt((x[:,None] - x[i])**2 + (y[None,:]-y[j])**2)

#Now sum all the points that are closer than 10 units away.
np.sum(v[r<=10])
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1  
thats great! ... I need to use numpy more often –  Joran Beasley Sep 18 '12 at 16:02
    
np.sum(v[r<=10]) can get kind of sluggish for big arrays. If you experience that you can use np.sum(v * (r <= 10)) –  Bi Rico Sep 18 '12 at 16:10
    
Thank you - this is essentially my solution now, but the aim is to have this done for all r - thus requiring to loop through the r values. My question is whether this can be avoided. I used the where function instead of the [<r] construct and it indeed gets slow for my quite large arrays... I improved the wording of the question now. –  user673592 Sep 18 '12 at 16:20
    
@BiRico -- Iteresting observation (I've never noticed it). Do you have any idea why that is the case? –  mgilson Sep 18 '12 at 16:52
    
@JoranBeasley -- Me too. I wish I could give numpy a +1 just for being awesome. –  mgilson Sep 18 '12 at 17:32

I'll suggest a strategy, but have no time now to suggest working code. Do the following: (note that you cannot chose an exact distance, but consecutive, continuous RANGES of distances, since very few points will be at a precise given distance).

  1. Create a KDTree from the array;
  2. Take the sum of every point INSIDE a given circle, for circles increasing linearly;
  3. Calculate the value for the "shell" between each circle by subtracting the inner circle from the outer circle.

It should be something like this (of course you'll have to fill some blanks):

import numpy
from scipy.spatial import KDTree

tree = scipy.spatial.KDTree(reshaped_array)
sums = [numpy.sum(tree.query_ball_point(dist)) for dist in xrange(desired_distances)]
desired_result = numpy.diff(sums)

Hope this helps!

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I think this can be useful. It may be a bit faster by hand if done right, but if you need multiple points, this is easy and fast, at least to get all points up to a certain interesting distance. It could be combined with the bincount approach too. –  seberg Sep 18 '12 at 19:36

Create some sample points:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> vals = np.array([[1,2],[3,4.5],[5,6]])
>>> vals
array([[ 1. ,  2. ],
       [ 3. ,  4.5],
       [ 5. ,  6. ]])

Calculate center point:

>>> center = np.mean(vals, axis=0)
>>> center
array([ 3.        ,  4.16666667])

Calculate distance from center point:

>>> d = vals - center
>>> dist_from_center = np.sqrt(d[:,0]*d[:,0] + d[:,1]*d[:,1])
>>> dist_from_center
array([ 2.94863434,  0.33333333,  2.71313677])
share|improve this answer

This won't scale up very well to super-large arrays, and it's not that robust, but it's kind of cute anyway.

Make a test array:

In [148]: import numpy as np

In [149]: m = np.random.random((8, 9))

In [150]: m
Out[150]: 
array([[ 0.36254361,  0.92449435,  0.36954906,  0.13007562,  0.95031795,
         0.1341706 ,  0.6417435 ,  0.25467616,  0.72431605],
       [ 0.75959927,  0.53992222,  0.76544104,  0.94409118,  0.27048638,
         0.44747388,  0.42691671,  0.75695594,  0.10366086],
       [ 0.12424304,  0.06642197,  0.08953764,  0.66546555,  0.30932551,
         0.50375697,  0.1344662 ,  0.31008366,  0.13953257],
       [ 0.28643294,  0.12986936,  0.39022482,  0.72869735,  0.84537494,
         0.62683481,  0.88539889,  0.35697751,  0.96332492],
       [ 0.67678959,  0.60373389,  0.15151052,  0.53586538,  0.50470088,
         0.39664842,  0.93584004,  0.97386657,  0.50405521],
       [ 0.04613492,  0.53676995,  0.60119919,  0.5559467 ,  0.09392262,
         0.69938864,  0.35719754,  0.79775878,  0.16634076],
       [ 0.00879703,  0.60874483,  0.25390384,  0.48368248,  0.52770161,
         0.64563258,  0.27353424,  0.86046696,  0.04489414],
       [ 0.80883157,  0.44484305,  0.52325907,  0.49172028,  0.46731106,
         0.06400542,  0.75671515,  0.55930335,  0.70721442]])

Get the indices:

In [151]: centre = (3,5)

In [152]: ii = np.indices(m.shape)

In [153]: ii
Out[153]: 
array([[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
        [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
        [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3],
        [4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4],
        [5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5],
        [6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6],
        [7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7]],

       [[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]])

In [154]: di = ii[0]-centre[0], ii[1]-centre[1]

Get the squared distances:

In [155]: dr2 = (di[0]**2+di[1]**2)

In [156]: dr2
Out[156]: 
array([[34, 25, 18, 13, 10,  9, 10, 13, 18],
       [29, 20, 13,  8,  5,  4,  5,  8, 13],
       [26, 17, 10,  5,  2,  1,  2,  5, 10],
       [25, 16,  9,  4,  1,  0,  1,  4,  9],
       [26, 17, 10,  5,  2,  1,  2,  5, 10],
       [29, 20, 13,  8,  5,  4,  5,  8, 13],
       [34, 25, 18, 13, 10,  9, 10, 13, 18],
       [41, 32, 25, 20, 17, 16, 17, 20, 25]])

And use bincount to get the sums:

In [158]: np.bincount(dr2.flat, m.flat)
Out[158]: 
array([ 0.62683481,  2.63117922,  1.88433263,  0.        ,  2.23253738,
        3.63380441,  0.        ,  0.        ,  3.05475259,  2.13335292,
        3.27793323,  0.        ,  0.        ,  3.36554308,  0.        ,
        0.        ,  0.19387479,  1.89418207,  1.3926631 ,  0.        ,
        2.12771579,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,
        3.05014562,  0.80103263,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.8057342 ,
        0.        ,  0.        ,  0.44484305,  0.        ,  0.37134064,
        0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,
        0.        ,  0.80883157])
share|improve this answer
    
Missed that there was already a bincount solution... Best way to do it in my opinion. Add a np.add.accumulate there probably. (For large arrays, it should be sliced smaller first anyways...), and I think you forgot the np.sqrt for the euclidian distance. –  seberg Sep 18 '12 at 19:04
    
@seberg: no, I didn't forget it -- that's why it's dr2. bincount likes integers, that's among the reasons it's not very robust. –  DSM Sep 18 '12 at 19:31
    
Ah, true enough, if the OP did not want to round, missed that... But its a problem you always have with oddly "sampled" data, not a problem with the bincount method. –  seberg Sep 18 '12 at 19:42

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