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Trying to resolve error C2248 related to abstract base class using implementation of copy/move ctors/assignment operators and dtor (Rule of Five) and a few questions come up:

1) Why does the rule of 5, primarily relating to the dtor, apply when the unique_ptr data members are handled automatically? The dtor implementation should be left empty correct, since the unique_ptrs are automatically destroyed once their owners go out of scope?

2) Suppose another class had a member of type std::unique_ptr of a vector of the same type. In order for this class to be copyable, it must have a copy ctor and copy assignment operator that clone the unique_ptr data member? I have seen this solution, but is seems like the original poster just switched over to shared_ptr for the sake of removing the error alone with little consideration of ownership management. Is this the correct strategy?

3) Consider the same case as question 2 above relating to vector of unique_ptr. Should dtor include a call to clear() the vector?

4) The assignment operators for the Derived1 are not correct. But the base class is supposed to have copy and move assignment operators, since it has copy/move ctors (rule of 4/5). These can't actually be used outside of the class since it is abstract and thus no instances will be assigned. But how do I utilize this code from the derived classes? Each derived class needs to be able to move/copy the base data members and it's own data members. I'm not sure what to do.

    #include <algorithm>
#include <memory>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

class Base{

public:
    Base() : m_subBases(){};

    /*  copy ctor */
    Base(const Base& other) : m_subBases(){
        *this = other;
    };

    /*  move ctor */
    Base(Base&& other) : m_subBases(){
        *this =std::move( other);
    };

    /*  Move assignment operator*/
    Base& operator=(Base&& other){
        m_subBases = std::move(other.m_subBases);
        return *this;
    };

    /*  Copy assignment operator */
    Base& operator=(const Base& other){
        for(int i = 0; i < other.m_subBases.size(); i++)
            m_subBases.push_back(other.m_subBases[i]->clone());

        return *this;
    };

    /* virtual dtor */
    virtual ~Base(){
        m_subBases.clear();
    };

    /* Used for creating clones of unique_ptrs */
    virtual std::unique_ptr <Base> clone() const= 0;

    /* Do something */
    virtual void execute(float f) = 0;

    //Omitted data member access methods

protected:
    std::vector < std::unique_ptr <Base> > m_subBases;
};

class Derived1 : public Base{

public:
    Derived1() :  Base(){};

    /*  copy ctor */
    Derived1(const Derived1& other) : Base(other){
        *this = other;
    };

    /*  move ctor */
    Derived1(Derived1&& other) : Base(std::move(other)){
        *this = std::move(other);
    };

    /*  Move assignment operator*/
    Derived1& operator=(Derived1&& other){

        //This is redundant when called in the move ctor because
        // of the call to Base(std::move(other))
        m_subBases = std::move(other.m_subBases);

        m_string = other.m_string;
        return *this;
    };

    /*  Copy assignment operator */
    Derived1& operator=( const Derived1& other){

        //This is redundant when called in the copy ctor because
        // of the call to Base(other)
        for(int i = 0; i < other.m_subBases.size(); i++)
            m_subBases.push_back(other.m_subBases[i]->clone());

        m_string = other.m_string;
        return *this;
    };

    /* virtual dtor */
    virtual ~Derived1(){};

    /* Used for creating clones of unique_ptrs */
    virtual std::unique_ptr <Base> clone() const{
        return std::unique_ptr <Base> (new Derived1(*this));
    };

    virtual void execute(float f){
        std::cout << "Derived1 " << f << std::endl; 
    };
protected:

    std::string m_string;
};
share|improve this question
3  
Look! A wall of code with a wall of text! –  Tony The Lion Sep 18 '12 at 15:49
2  
Yes, please create a short example that shows your problem, with a short explanation. It's just overwhelming to read this. –  Tony The Lion Sep 18 '12 at 15:50
3  
Yes. Please edit your question to make it short and concise. For example, sentences like "I hope the title question to this post accurately reflects the nature of the problem." does NOT add any valuable information related to the problem. Please remove all such sentences from the question. –  Nawaz Sep 18 '12 at 15:51
2  
Assignment in the copy constructor is very frightening. –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 15:55
2  
I think the important message to take home is that when you're using components like unique_ptr, you don't write any of the copy constructors, copy-assignment operators and destructors. The implicitly defined versions will do just fine. –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 16:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd like to offer an alternative approach. Not the Scary Rule of Five, but the Pleasant Rule of Zero, as @Tony The Lion has already suggested. A full implementation of my proposal has been coded by se­ve­ral people, and there's a fine version in @R. Martinho Fernandes's library, but I'll present a simplified version.

First, let's recap:

The Rule of Zero: Don't write a copy- or move-constructor, a copy- or move-assignment ope­ra­tor, or a destructor. Instead, compose your class of components which handle a single responsibility and encap­su­late the desired behaviour for the individual resource in question.

There's an obvious caveat: When you design the single-responsibility class, you must of course obey:

The Rule of Five: If you write any one of copy- or move-constructor, copy- or move-assignment ope­ra­tor, or destructor, you must implement all five. (But the "five" functions needed by this rule are actually: Destructor, Copy-Const, Move-Const, Assignment and Swap.)

Let's do it. First, your consumer:

struct X;

struct Base
{
    std::vector<value_ptr<X>> v;
};

struct Derived : Base
{
};

Note that both Base and Derived obey the Rule of Zero!

All we need to do is implement value_ptr. If the pointee is non-polymorphic, the following will do:

template <typename T>
class value_ptr
{
    T * ptr;
public:
    // Constructors
    constexpr value_ptr()      noexcept : ptr(nullptr) { }
    constexpr value_ptr(T * p) noexcept : ptr(p)       { }

    // Rule of Five begins here:
    ~value_ptr() { ::delete ptr; }
    value_ptr(value_ptr const & rhs) : ptr(rhs.ptr ? ::new T(*rhs.ptr) : nullptr) { }
    value_ptr(value_ptr && rhs) noexcept : ptr(rhs.ptr) { rhs.ptr = nullptr; }
    value_ptr & operator=(value_ptr rhs) { swap(rhs); return *this; }
    void swap(value_ptr & rhs) noexcept { std::swap(rhs.ptr, ptr); }

    // Pointer stuff
    T & operator*() const noexcept { return *ptr; }
    T * operator->() const noexcept { return ptr; }
};

template <typename T, typename ...Args>
value_ptr<T> make_value(Args &&... args)
{
    return value_ptr<T>(::new T(std::forward<Args>(args)...));
}

If you would like smart pointer that handles polymorphic base class pointers, I suggest you demand that your base class provide a virtual clone() function, and that you implement a clone_ptr<T>, whose copy constructor would be like this:

clone_ptr(clone_ptr const & rhs) : ptr(rhs.ptr ? rhs.ptr->clone() : nullptr) { }
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you need to implement all five? Whats wrong with implementing copy operations yourself while leaving the rest defaulted, for responsability classes containing move only objects? –  Grizzly Sep 18 '12 at 16:38
    
@Grizzly: If all other functions can be left defaulted, then it stands to reason that your copy constructor can also be left defaulted. Which ever way you turn it, if you really do need to define any one of the five, you are very likely doing some manual resource handling that needs to be handled in all of them. –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 16:42
    
What I mentioned was a scenario where the class contains a member variable, which is movable, but not copieable. That is hardly doing manual resource handling. In that case the default is typically fine for the destructor and move operations, since those will be handled by the member, however copying needs special attention, since the member doesn't have copy capabilities, so depending on what you are doing you either deep copy or create a new object. Another scenario would be a member with neither copy or move functionality, where the default destructor would still be fine, but nothing else. –  Grizzly Sep 18 '12 at 16:50
1  
@Grizzly: Well, I'm sure you can contrive a situation like the one you describe, but I'd like to claim that you could almost always handle this more elegantly by using an appropriate component, rather than, say, abusing a unique pointer for a deep-copying role. The Rule of Five is a general design guide, not an absolute mandate. If you follow it, your code will be nicer, but you don't have to. –  Kerrek SB Sep 18 '12 at 16:52
    
@KerrekSB Trying to play with code. Reviewing this link, VS 2010 does not support constexpr, noexcept nor variadic templates. I don't think constexpr is essential for functionality, nor is the make_ function since the ctor can be used? But how significant is the use of noexcept in this example? –  user1679238 Sep 18 '12 at 18:43

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