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I have the following code in Java (as well as a few more subclasses of Num) and was trying to figure out why the overriden method getFactory() is returning Num according to the isEqual method. If I test n.getFactory().getClass().toString() it prints out RealNumber as expected, but in the function call isEqual(n.getFactory()) it tries to implement isEqual(Num n), not isEqual(RealNumber r). I was wondering why this is the case?

Here's the problematic part of the code:

public abstract class Num
{
   //Why is the overridden method not sending the appropriate (covariant) return type
   public abstract Num getFactory();

   public boolean isEqual(Num n)
   {
       //this call is resulting in a loop 
       return this.isEqual(n.getFactory());
   }

   //This has a narrower parameter list so why isn't this method called when isEqual is called  
   //with a real number argument
   public abstract boolean isEqual(RealNumber r);
}

public class RealNumber extends Num
{
     double value;

     public RealNumber(RealNumber r)
     {
         this.value = r.value;
     }

     public RealNumber getFactory()
    {
          return new RealNumber(this);
    }

    public boolean isEqual(RealNumber r)
    {
         if (r.value == this.value)
         {
               return true;
         }
         return false;
    }

}

Thanks for the help in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Which programming language? I'm guessing Java or C# ? ;) –  Morten Jensen Sep 18 '12 at 16:24
    
sorry about that it's java, I edited the text above to reflect that –  bert2000 Sep 19 '12 at 14:58

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