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I want to provide my visitors the ability to see images in high quality, is there any way I can detect the window size?

Or better yet, the viewport size of the browser with JavaScript? See green area here:

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9 Answers

up vote 105 down vote accepted

Cross-browser @media (width) and @media (height) values

var w = Math.max(document.documentElement.clientWidth, window.innerWidth || 0)
var h = Math.max(document.documentElement.clientHeight, window.innerHeight || 0)

window.innerWidth and .innerHeight

  • gets CSS viewport @media (width) and @media (height) which include scrollbars
  • initial-scale and zoom variations may cause mobile values to wrongly scale down to what PPK calls the visual viewport and be smaller than the @media values
  • zoom may cause values to be 1px off due to native rounding
  • undefined in IE8-

document.documentElement.clientWidth and .clientHeight

  • equals CSS viewport width minus scrollbar width
  • matches @media (width) and @media (height) when there is no scrollbar
  • same as jQuery(window).width() which jQuery calls the browser viewport
  • available cross-browser

Resources

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Just wondering if the quirksmode link says clientWidth / clientHeight is a no-go in IE9 on mobile. Can you please clarify on that? Excellent answer by the way! Thanks! –  its_me Feb 22 '13 at 13:08
2  
@01100001 Replace $ with verge. If you want to integrate into jQuery then do jQuery.extend(verge). See: verge.airve.com/#static –  ryanve Feb 24 '13 at 17:54
1  
Oh, I missed that note in the doc. Didn't know using verge would be this easy! Thanks a lot! –  its_me Feb 25 '13 at 14:03
3  
Just wanted to mention that in IE8 (and perhaps others) you must have the <!DOCTYPE html> at the top of the page in order for the code to work. –  Tzury Bar Yochay May 9 '13 at 7:44
1  
I'm not happy with clientWidth/Height on mobile devices, really tripleodeon.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/table.html –  Dan Jul 31 '13 at 10:57
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jQuery dimension functions

$(window).width() and $(window).height()

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Thank you all for the quick answers. –  Alix Axel Aug 8 '09 at 7:17
54  
a non jQuery solution would be good –  allyourcode Dec 12 '09 at 23:18
24  
@allyourcode, impossible, jQuery is the answer to all. –  Xeoncross Jun 14 '11 at 15:40
2  
This doesn't gets viewport size, but overall document size. Try it. –  Alejandro Iglesias Aug 9 '13 at 19:34
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You can use the window.innerWidth and window.innerHeight properties.

innerHeight vs outerHeight

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9  
Doesn't work in IE - quirksmode.org/dom/w3c_cssom.html#windowview –  Chetan Sastry Aug 8 '09 at 7:11
7  
Even though this doesn't work in IE +1 for diagram :D. For a question like this, it should be a crime not to have more of these. –  allyourcode Dec 12 '09 at 23:14
5  
@CMS document.documentElement.clientWidth is more accurate and more widely supported than window.innerWidth –  ryanve Jan 16 '12 at 5:24
1  
@ryanve If by "more accurate" you mean "doesn't even remotely do the same thing" then yes :P –  boxed May 7 '13 at 11:39
    
@boxed See the 2013 update to stackoverflow.com/a/8876069/770127 –  ryanve May 7 '13 at 15:13
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If you aren't using jQuery, it gets ugly. Here's a snippet that should work on all new browsers. The behavior is different in Quirks mode and standards mode in IE. This takes care of it.

var elem = (document.compatMode === "CSS1Compat") ? 
    document.documentElement :
    document.body;

var height = elem.clientHeight;
var width = elem.clientWidth;
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6  
Doesn't this give you the height of the page, not the viewport? That's what this page seems to indicate: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.clientHeight –  allyourcode Dec 12 '09 at 23:13
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There is a difference between window.innerHeight and document.documentElement.clientHeight. The first includes the height of the horizontal scrollbar.

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You mean width? –  Alix Axel Feb 16 '13 at 22:51
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I was able to find a definitive answer in JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, 6th Edition by O'Reilly, p. 391:

This solution works even in Quirks mode, while ryanve and ScottEvernden's current solution do not.

function getViewportSize(w) {

    // Use the specified window or the current window if no argument
    w = w || window;

    // This works for all browsers except IE8 and before
    if (w.innerWidth != null) return { w: w.innerWidth, h: w.innerHeight };

    // For IE (or any browser) in Standards mode
    var d = w.document;
    if (document.compatMode == "CSS1Compat")
        return { w: d.documentElement.clientWidth,
           h: d.documentElement.clientHeight };

    // For browsers in Quirks mode
    return { w: d.body.clientWidth, h: d.body.clientHeight };

}

except for the fact that I wonder why the line if (document.compatMode == "CSS1Compat") is not if (d.compatMode == "CSS1Compat"), everything looks good.

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This code is from http://andylangton.co.uk/articles/javascript/get-viewport-size-javascript/

function viewport() {
    var e = window, a = 'inner';
    if (!('innerWidth' in window )) {
        a = 'client';
        e = document.documentElement || document.body;
    }
    return { width : e[ a+'Width' ] , height : e[ a+'Height' ] };
}

NB : to read the width, use console.log('viewport width'+viewport().width);

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A solution that would conform to W3C standards would be to create a transparent div (for example dynamically with JavaScript), set its width and height to 100vw/100vh (Viewport units) and then get its offsetWidth and offsetHeight. After that, the element can be removed again. This will not work in older browsers because the viewport units are relatively new, but if you don't care about them but about (soon-to-be) standards instead, you could definitely go this way:

var objNode = document.createElement("div");
objNode.style.width  = "100vw";
objNode.style.height = "100vh";
document.body.appendChild(objNode);
var intViewportWidth  = objNode.offsetWidth;
var intViewportHeight = objNode.offsetHeight;
document.body.removeChild(objNode);

Of course, you could also set objNode.style.position = "fixed" and then use 100% as width/height - this should have the same effect and improve compatibility to some extent. Also, setting position to fixed might be a good idea in general, because otherwise the div will be invisible but consume some space, which will lead to scrollbars appearing etc.

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I know this has an acceptable answer, but I ran into a situation where clientWidth didn't work, as iPhone (at least mine) returned 980, not 320, so I used window.screen.width. I was working on existing site being made "responsive" and needed to force larger browsers to use a different meta viewport.

Hope this helps someone, it may not be perfect, but it works in my testing on iOs and Android.

//sweet hack to set meta viewport for desktop sites squeezing down to mobile that are big and have a fixed width 
  //first see if they have window.screen.width avail
  (function() {
    if (window.screen.width)
    {
      var setViewport = {
        //smaller devices
        phone: 'width=device-width,initial-scale=1,maximum-scale=1,user-scalable=no',
        //bigger ones, be sure to set width to the needed and likely hardcoded width of your site at large breakpoints  
        other: 'width=1045,user-scalable=yes',
        //current browser width
        widthDevice: window.screen.width,
        //your css breakpoint for mobile, etc. non-mobile first
        widthMin: 560,
        //add the tag based on above vars and environment 
        setMeta: function () {
          var params = (this.widthDevice <= this.widthMin) ? this.phone : this.other; 
          var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0];
          var viewport = document.createElement('meta');
          viewport.setAttribute('name','viewport');
          viewport.setAttribute('content',params);
          head.appendChild(viewport);
        }
      }
      //call it 
      setViewport.setMeta();
    }
  }).call(this);
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