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I have an array of N numbers which are same.I am applying Quick sort on it. What should be the time complexity of the sorting in this case.

I goggled around this question but did not get the exact explanation.

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The answer will vary depending on which Quicksort implementation you are studying. So pick one and study it. –  Raymond Chen Sep 18 '12 at 16:15
    
Can u plz. explain it more specifically? –  Asha Sep 19 '12 at 11:33
    
There are many different versions of Quicksort. The answer will be different depending on which version you pick. This sounds like a homework assignment, in which case there is probably a specific version of Quicksort the instructor wants you to study. –  Raymond Chen Sep 19 '12 at 15:10
    
A naive quicksort algorithm will be O(n^2). This is the case even if it has a smarter pivot selection algorithm. To avoid O(n^2), a quicksort algorithm needs to partition the numbers into 3 sets for each pivot (less than, equal to, greater than). –  ronalchn Sep 23 '12 at 1:05

2 Answers 2

It will always do the same count of comparisions (if you use pure quicksort), because it has to check all numbers (unless you add some special function, that will check for special cases like this one). But it doesn't have to switch any numbers, so it is best case scenario, therefor it's complexity should be (n log n).

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The explanation which u gave is correct but i think we can reduce number of comparisions. –  Asha Sep 19 '12 at 11:27
    
what function would you add to achieve reduction? –  Minarth Sep 19 '12 at 20:00
    
Actually, an already-sorted array is the well-known worst-case for classic quicksort. –  Raymond Chen Sep 20 '12 at 4:36
    
@RaymondChen, depends on implementation - there are variations which can guarantee O(n log n). –  ronalchn Sep 23 '12 at 1:11
    
@ronalchn That's why I specifically said "classic" quicksort. I still don't know what "pure" quicksort is. –  Raymond Chen Sep 23 '12 at 3:26

A naive quicksort algorithm will be O(n^2). This is the case even if it has a smarter pivot selection algorithm. To avoid O(n^2), a quicksort algorithm needs to partition the numbers into 3 sets for each pivot (less than, equal to, greater than).

A smarter pivot selection algorithm is:

  • one based on heuristics (eg. select median of candidate pivots obtained from 1st element, mid element, and last element)
  • one used for O(n log n) guarantees - won't go into this here, but such an algorithm may guarantee that the pivot is from, for example, between 25-75% of the sorted array.

However, most ordinary quicksort algorithms partition the numbers into those less than or greater than the pivot. Those equal to the pivot are arbitrarily bundled with those greater or less than the pivot.

In the case of all numbers being equal, each partition will yield only a single partition - thus only reducing the size of the remaining partition by 1 each time.

To avoid this, a quicksort algorithm would need to partition the numbers into 3 sets - those less than, greater than, and equal to the pivot.

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