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I was working on retrieving date of first week of the year and I found very strange behavior.

I tested the following code snippet both in Java console app and Android emulator and it produces different output.

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.set(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1);
    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.SUNDAY);
    System.out.println(sdf.format(cal.getTime()));

Following output was produced

Android log cat : 2012/09/17 (incorrect)

Java console : 2012/01/01 (correct)

And the strange thing is if I used following code both in Android and Java it produces same correct output. The only difference was I swapped the 2nd and 3rd line from the above code.

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.SUNDAY);
    cal.set(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1);
    System.out.println(sdf.format(cal.getTime()));

Android log cat : 2012/01/01 (correct)

Java console : 2012/01/01 (correct)

I am very curious to know regarding this.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
It is pretty interesting. Once I put cal.get(Calendar.MONTH) between WEEK_OF_YEAR line and DAY_OK_WEEK line, the output becomes correct. Can anyone guess the reason? –  Heejin Sep 18 '12 at 22:58
1  
Good question. To clarify, when you say "Java", you are referring to Sun's (well, Oracle's) implementation? –  Cheezmeister Sep 18 '12 at 23:40
    
@Cheezmeister Yes I am using Sun(Oracle) JDK –  Vishal Vyas Sep 23 '12 at 11:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It seems that Calendar class internally has two data containers.

protected long time

protected int[] fields

So when you call cal.set(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1), you change the values in fields, not time of the class.

In Java API

protected abstract void computeFields()

Converts the current millisecond time value time to calendar field values in fields[]. This allows you to sync up the calendar field values with a new time that is set for the calendar. The time is not recomputed first; to recompute the time, then the fields, call the complete() method.

I think in the first case of Android computeFields() is not called internally.

To check my theory, I tested the following code:

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy.MM.dd");
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
System.out.println(cal);
System.out.println(sdf.format(cal.getTime()));
cal.set(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1);
System.out.println(cal);
System.out.println(sdf.format(cal.getTime()));
cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.SUNDAY);
System.out.println(cal);
System.out.println(sdf.format(cal.getTime()));

LogCat:

java.util.GregorianCalendar[time=1348010308802,areFieldsSet=true,lenient=true,zone=org.apache.harmony.luni.internal.util.ZoneInfo["null",mRawOffset=0,mUseDst=false],firstDayOfWeek=1,minimalDaysInFirstWeek=4,ERA==1,YEAR==2012,MONTH==8,WEEK_OF_YEAR==38,WEEK_OF_MONTH==4,DAY_OF_MONTH==18,DAY_OF_YEAR==262,DAY_OF_WEEK==3,DAY_OF_WEEK_IN_MONTH==3,AM_PM==1,HOUR==11,HOUR_OF_DAY=23,MINUTE==18,SECOND==28,MILLISECOND==802,ZONE_OFFSET==0,DST_OFFSET==0]

2012.09.18

java.util.GregorianCalendar[time=?,areFieldsSet=false,lenient=true,zone=org.apache.harmony.luni.internal.util.ZoneInfo["null",mRawOffset=0,mUseDst=false],firstDayOfWeek=1,minimalDaysInFirstWeek=4,ERA==1,YEAR==2012,MONTH==8,WEEK_OF_YEAR==1,WEEK_OF_MONTH==4,DAY_OF_MONTH==18,DAY_OF_YEAR==262,DAY_OF_WEEK==3,DAY_OF_WEEK_IN_MONTH==3,AM_PM==1,HOUR==11,HOUR_OF_DAY=23,MINUTE==18,SECOND==28,MILLISECOND==802,ZONE_OFFSET==0,DST_OFFSET==0]

2012.01.03

java.util.GregorianCalendar[time=?,areFieldsSet=false,lenient=true,zone=org.apache.harmony.luni.internal.util.ZoneInfo["null",mRawOffset=0,mUseDst=false],firstDayOfWeek=1,minimalDaysInFirstWeek=4,ERA==1,YEAR==2012,MONTH==8,WEEK_OF_YEAR==1,WEEK_OF_MONTH==4,DAY_OF_MONTH==18,DAY_OF_YEAR==262,DAY_OF_WEEK==1,DAY_OF_WEEK_IN_MONTH==3,AM_PM==1,HOUR==11,HOUR_OF_DAY=23,MINUTE==18,SECOND==28,MILLISECOND==802,ZONE_OFFSET==0,DST_OFFSET==0]

2012.09.16

As we can see above, values in the fields are changed, but internal time is denoted as ?, telling that time is not synced with fields.

You got unsynced time using getTime() method and printed it out.

I think Calendar in Android is designed to delay the sync until it is really needed.

ADDED

I found the following in Java API:

Calendar fields can be changed using three methods: set(), add(), and roll().

set(f, value) changes field f to value. In addition, it sets an internal member variable to indicate that field f has been changed. Although field f is changed immediately, the calendar's milliseconds is not recomputed until the next call to get(), getTime(), or getTimeInMillis() is made. Thus, multiple calls to set() do not trigger multiple, unnecessary computations. As a result of changing a field using set(), other fields may also change, depending on the field, the field value, and the calendar system. In addition, get(f) will not necessarily return value after the fields have been recomputed. The specifics are determined by the concrete calendar class.

ADDED

To check whether "The specifics are determined by the concrete calendar class" is true, I checked actual codes of Dalvik and JDK 6.

Set method in Dalvik's Calendar

from https://www.codeaurora.org/git/projects/qrd-gb-dsds-7225/repository/revisions/cc99b832a941dc8cbb86f1607d04eb87935ddbfd/entry/android/dalvik/libcore/luni/src/main/java/java/util/Calendar.java

public void set(int field, int value) {
    fields[field] = value;
    isSet[field] = true;
    areFieldsSet = isTimeSet = false;
    if (field > MONTH && field < AM_PM) {
        lastDateFieldSet = field;
    }
    if (field == HOUR || field == HOUR_OF_DAY) {
        lastTimeFieldSet = field;
    }
    if (field == AM_PM) {
        lastTimeFieldSet = HOUR;
    }
}

Set method in JDK 6's Calendar

public void set(int field, int value) {
    if (isLenient() && areFieldsSet && !areAllFieldsSet) {
        computeFields();
    }
    internalSet(field, value);
    isTimeSet = false;
    areFieldsSet = false;
    isSet[field] = true;
    stamp[field] = nextStamp++;
    if (nextStamp == Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
        adjustStamp();
    }
}

Specific implementations are pretty different. To figure out the exact reason of your problem, you should look at both implementations in detail.

share|improve this answer
    
So can we say this as a bug in Android SDK? –  Vishal Vyas Sep 23 '12 at 11:26
    
@VishalVyas It's not a bug. From the excerpt of JAVA API in my answer: get(f) will not necessarily return value after the fields have been recomputed. The specifics are determined by the concrete calendar class. –  Heejin Sep 23 '12 at 13:45
1  
@VishalVyas I checked the actual codes of Dalvik Calendar and JDK 6's Calendar and found that they have different implementations. I added more about this to my answer. –  Heejin Sep 23 '12 at 13:47

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