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I have been running some tests to find out why some CSS margins collapse and why some don't. I have the following test code:

<div id="seconddiv" style="margin-top:10px; margin-bottom:10px;">
    <p style="height:200px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">This is the first paragraph in  the second div!This paragraph is 200px tall.</p>
    <p style="height:300px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">This is the second paragraph in the second div!This paragraph is 300 px tall.</p>
    <p style="height:400px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">This is the third paragraph in the second div!This paragraph is 400px tall.</p>
</div>

I am trying to accurately get the height of the div, but scrollHeight returns "910px". Why is that? I expected "900px" as the scrollHeight, as it does not include margins.

Did some of the <p> margins collapse and get counted in the height? Why some and not others. I tried many different combinations of margin heights and no values reveal what is going on.

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1  
Nitpick: scrollHeight isn't part of any general standard, it's a Microsoft specific thing that a few browsers happen to have copied. Hence it's entirely possible that different browsers will implement different ways. –  Rushyo Sep 18 '12 at 16:55
4  
"Why do only some HTML margins collapse?" because the spec defines it that way. –  zzzzBov Sep 18 '12 at 16:56
    
the height of seconddiv is 200 + 5 + 300 + 5 + 400. The margins between the inner p elements are part of the div's height –  zzzzBov Sep 18 '12 at 16:57
    
@zzzzBov Is it the top or bottom margins of the paragraphs that get added to the div height? I could understand if the scrollHeight was 200 + 5(margin-bottom) + 5(margin-top) + 300 + 5(margin-bottom) + 5(margin-top) + 400. –  Jon Sep 18 '12 at 17:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I do not think you're understanding what "margin-collapse" means.

I'm going to use this simplified markup in the following examples:

HTML:

<div>
   <span>A</span>
   <span>B</span>
   <span>C</span>
</div>

CSS:

span {
    display: block;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 5px 0;
}

Instead of displaying each margin as separate spacing, top and bottom margins on elements will merge with their sibling (or if no prev/next sibling exists, their parent*) elements so that the spacing between is the largest margin.

If there were no margin collapse, the above markup would appear as:

+div-----+
| margin |
|+span--+|
||A     ||
|+------+|
| margin |
| margin |
|+span--+|
||B     ||
|+------+|
| margin |
| margin |
|+span--+|
||C     ||
|+------+|
| margin |
+--------+

With margin-collapse, the markup is displaying as:

  margin
+div-----+
|+span--+|
||A     ||
|+------+|
| margin |
|+span--+|
||B     ||
|+------+|
| margin |
|+span--+|
||C     ||
|+------+|
+--------+
  margin

What this means for the height of the div is that it includes the height of each of its elements and the margins between them.

In my example the height is 100 + 5 + 100 + 5 + 100 = 310.

In your example the height is 200 + 5 + 300 + 5 + 400 = 910.


* There is some additional complexity involving padding, positioning and floating, which is described by the specification.

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2  
Woah, I get it now! I thought collapsing meant a resulting single margin with the height of both previous margins. It is really just getting rid of the smaller of the two margins! Thanks! –  Jon Sep 18 '12 at 17:13
    
This is an excellent visual representation of margin collapse. Well done. –  Ryan Kinal Jun 12 '13 at 14:03

scrollHeight returns

the distance between the top and bottom edges of the object's content

Even if every margin in your example collapse, the second p still has 5px margin above and below, which count in the total distance between its edges.

That's 900px + 5px + 5px = 910px.

To make it simpler, check this example:

<div id="seconddiv" style="margin-top:10px; margin-bottom:10px;">

    <!--
    Top edge is first p's top position (without top margin)
    -->

    <p style="height:100px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">
    First p adds 105px (100px height + 5px bottom margin collapsed) = 105px
    </p>
    <p style="height:100px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">
    Second p adds 105px (100px height + 5px bottom margin collapsed) = 210px
    </p>
    <p style="height:100px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">
    Third p adds 105px (100px height + 5px bottom margin collapsed) = 315px
    </p>
    <p style="height:100px; margin-top:5px; margin-bottom:5px;">
    Last p adds 100px (100px height) = 415px
    </p>

    <!--
    We're at the bottom edge. Margins are excluded, the total height is 415px
    -->

</div>​
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Margins are added into the Box Model so height in your case is elem height + margins. However Margins collapse when to adjoining elems have margins, the max wins vs the two being added. Good article explaining it here http://www.960development.com/understand-css-margins-collapsing/

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Good post on Box Models addedbytes.com/articles/for-beginners/… –  Alex Reynolds Sep 18 '12 at 17:07
    
Great articles. –  Jon Sep 18 '12 at 17:14

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