Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a number of methods with different signatures. Based on some external code all this methods might be called. You might think of them as some event handlers.

Now I should have two implementations as so:

  • Each implementation really handles only part of all possible events.
  • Each implementation simply does nothing for all events it do not want to / can not handle.

I could of course declare an interface for all possible handlers but then I will have to create empty methods (handlers) in each implementation. Even for those events I do not want to / can not process.

I am thinking about doing something like the following:

abstract class Base
{
    public virtual void First(int i, double d) { /* no implementation */ }
    public virtual void Second(double d) { /* no implementation */ }
    public virtual void Third(string s, int i) { /* no implementation */ }
}

class Child : Base
{
    public override void First(int i, double d) { /* implementation */ }
    public override void Second(double d) { /* implementation */ }
}

class AnotherChild : Base
{
    public override void Second(double d) { /* implementation */ }
    public override void Third(string s, int i) { /* implementation */ }
}

This approach forces me to create empty implementations for all possible handlers in the base abstract class.

Could you recommend something better? An approach that doesn't require to produce large number of empty methods?

I am using C# 2.0 and can't use newer version of the language for this task.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Jim G., Sean Cheshire, martin clayton, j0k, AVD Sep 19 '12 at 12:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
I think what you are doing there perfectly makes sense. I don't think the empty method bodies are a problem of any kind. Alternatively, you could use regular events that all derived classes subscribe to. –  usr Sep 18 '12 at 16:59
    
@JcFx I need to use either implementation in another class. That class will call handlers for all possible events. One implementation will handle one part of the events and other implementation will handle other part. These parts do overlap. –  Bobrovsky Sep 18 '12 at 17:00
    
@leppie: why did you remove the 2.0 tag? the question is limited to that platform, so for example some dynamic approaches are out of question.. –  quetzalcoatl Sep 18 '12 at 18:12
    
@quetzalcoatl: it is largely irrelevant. –  leppie Sep 18 '12 at 19:03
1  
@quetzalcoatl: I concur. The framework is a constraint, but is not an integral part of the question. Much like "my boss requires all variable names to be in upper case" would not warrant an "uppercase" tag. –  JDB Sep 18 '12 at 20:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I agree with @usr - I don't see a problem with the empty functions. If you want to call a function, then it must exist. If it should do nothing in some cases, then that function should be empty. A base class with empty functions, versus an interface requiring the implementation of the same empty function over and over, seems like a very good idea.

If you are looking for an alternative, you could consider the Chain of Responsibility design pattern. Rather than calling a specific function, you could call a general function and then parameterize the desired behavior. You could then chain objects together (different chains in different situations) and give them all a chance to handle the behavior. If none of them handle it, then nothing happens.

This would work very well in some scenarios, but it's more complicated to implement then the very simple and elegant base class approach. Be careful not to over-engineer.

EXAMPLE
Here's an example of implementing a chain of command, based on the example you gave in your question:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication2 {

    interface ICommand {
        bool Execute( string action, params object[] parameters );
    }

    class Program {
        static void Main( string[] args ) {

            CommandChain l_chain1 = new CommandChain( new FirstCommand(), new SecondCommand() );
            CommandChain l_chain2 = new CommandChain( new SecondCommand(), new ThirdCommand() );

            // Chain 1

            if ( l_chain1.Execute( "first", (int) 1, (double) 1.1 ) )
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 1 executed First" );
            else
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 1 did not execute First" );

            if ( l_chain1.Execute( "second", (double) 1.2 ) )
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 1 executed Second" );
            else
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 1 did not execute Second" );

            if ( l_chain1.Execute( "third", "4", (int) 3 ) )
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 1 executed Third" );
            else
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 1 did not execute Third" );

            // Chain 2

            if ( l_chain2.Execute( "first", (int) 1, (double) 1.1 ) )
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 2 executed First" );
            else
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 2 did not execute First" );

            if ( l_chain2.Execute( "second", (double) 1.2 ) )
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 2 executed Second" );
            else
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 2 did not execute Second" );

            if ( l_chain2.Execute( "third", "4", (int) 3 ) )
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 2 executed Third" );
            else
                Console.WriteLine( "Chain 2 did not execute Third" );

            Console.ReadKey( true );

        }
    }

    class CommandChain {

        private ICommand[] _commands;

        public CommandChain( params ICommand[] commands ) {
            _commands = commands;
        }

        public bool Execute( string action, params object[] parameters ) {
            foreach ( ICommand l_command in _commands ) {
                if ( l_command.Execute( action, parameters ) )
                    return true;
            }
            return false;
        }

    }

    class FirstCommand : ICommand {
        public bool Execute( string action, params object[] parameters ) {
            if ( action == "first" &&
                parameters.Length == 2 &&
                parameters[0].GetType() == typeof( int ) &&
                parameters[1].GetType() == typeof( double ) ) {

                int i = (int) parameters[0];
                double d = (double) parameters[1];

                // do something

                return true;
            } else
                return false;
        }
    }

    class SecondCommand : ICommand {
        public bool Execute( string action, params object[] parameters ) {
            if ( action == "second" &&
                parameters.Length == 1 &&
                parameters[0].GetType() == typeof( double ) ) {

                double d = (double) parameters[0];

                // do something

                return true;
            } else
                return false;
        }
    }

    class ThirdCommand : ICommand {
        public bool Execute( string action, params object[] parameters ) {
            if ( action == "third" &&
                parameters.Length == 2 &&
                parameters[0].GetType() == typeof( string ) &&
                parameters[1].GetType() == typeof( int ) ) {

                string s = (string) parameters[0];
                int i = (int) parameters[1];

                // do something

                return true;
            } else
                return false;
        }
    }

}

(Please note that this example does not follow every programming best practice - I would not recommend implementing EXACTLY this code. For example, the action parameter would probably be better as an enum than a string, and returning some kind of CommandResult rather than a boolean. Use it for inspiration only.)

share|improve this answer

Just a side note: if this is for testing purposes, you can mock the interface and instantly have your do-nothing implementation with almost no code. You can similarily also materialize all the missing methods in a class that implements the interface only partially. Not for testing - you could use it in production also, but .. using mocks in prod smells a little, and having a boilerplate base empty implementation for a "handler-ish" contract is really no evil, and actually it is a nice thing to have as a base for further code - just like Cyborgx37 already noted.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.