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So I have inherited a rather crappy piece of code. Indentation is as I found it. Why does the else not throw an error? The code will never reach it as far as I understand.

    for l in range(1,9):
        indexes = pickle.load(open('%s_%d.pkl'%(fc,l)))

        clusters_sum = sum([indexes[i]['count'] for i in indexes])
        print >> out, 'Lane %d: %d clusters PF.\n%8s  %9s  %5s' % (l,clusters_sum,'Index','Count','%')
        for i in sorted(indexes, key=lambda x: indexes[x]['name']):
            pct = indexes[i]['count'] and indexes[i]['count']/clusters_sum*100 or 0
            if pct < 0.06: continue
            print >> out, '%8s  %9d  %5.1f' % (indexes[i]['name'], indexes[i]['count'], pct)
        else: print >> out
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Do you think else should fail because it is used on a for block, or because the print >> out line is not on a new line with an extra indent? –  Mark Hildreth Sep 18 '12 at 17:06
    
I think you have it backwards in that it will always reach it ... –  Joran Beasley Sep 18 '12 at 17:37
    
Does this follow a style guide? I would love to see the rest of the guide :) –  John La Rooy Sep 18 '12 at 18:18
    
No I had assumed the else was on the if statement. I wasn't aware that you can have an "else" on for loops in Python. –  wobbily_col Sep 19 '12 at 14:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

See the documentation on else clauses on loops, this is valid syntax and the code within the else block is executed as long as there was no break, return, or uncaught exception within the loop.

In this particular case the else clause will always be executed since none of the above conditions (other than an exception) can happen, so it is equivalent to the following:

    for l in range(1,9):
        indexes = pickle.load(open('%s_%d.pkl'%(fc,l)))

        clusters_sum = sum([indexes[i]['count'] for i in indexes])
        print >> out, 'Lane %d: %d clusters PF.\n%8s  %9s  %5s' % (l,clusters_sum,'Index','Count','%')
        for i in sorted(indexes, key=lambda x: indexes[x]['name']):
            pct = indexes[i]['count'] and indexes[i]['count']/clusters_sum*100 or 0
            if pct < 0.06: continue
            print >> out, '%8s  %9d  %5.1f' % (indexes[i]['name'], indexes[i]['count'], pct)
        
        print >> out
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1  
Of course, in this case, it will be executed unconditionally since there is no chance to break from that loop ... –  mgilson Sep 18 '12 at 17:05
    
OK, I hadn't seen that before. Is there any advantage to this over the way you have written it, (which is the way I would have expected). –  wobbily_col Sep 19 '12 at 13:58
1  
There isn't any advantage in this case. It is useful in cases where you want to know that there was no break in the loop, for example say you are looping over a list trying to find a particular element, and there is a break statement when the element is found. Inside of the else clause you would handle the case where the element does not exist in the list. –  Andrew Clark Sep 19 '12 at 16:12

Not sure if you're not understanding the indentation (or lack thereof) on the else statement, or the fact that there is an "else" on the for loop. If the former case...

The formatting is valid because print >> out is a "simple statement".

Here is the grammar for a for statement:

for_stmt ::=  "for" target_list "in" expression_list ":" suite
              ["else" ":" suite]

Notice that after the colon in the optional "else" block, it wants a "suite", the grammar of which is...

suite         ::=  stmt_list NEWLINE | NEWLINE INDENT statement+ DEDENT
statement     ::=  stmt_list NEWLINE | compound_stmt
stmt_list     ::=  simple_stmt (";" simple_stmt)* [";"]

So, it's possible in python to create a list of simple statements as an alternative to a block of statements. This is also valid...

for i in sorted(indexes, key=lambda x: indexes[x]['name']):
    pct = indexes[i]['count'] and indexes[i]['count']/clusters_sum*100 or 0
    if pct < 0.06: continue
    print >> out, '%8s  %9d  %5.1f' % (indexes[i]['name'], indexes[i]['count'], pct)
else: print >> out; print >> out; print >> out

and would be equivalent to...

for i in sorted(indexes, key=lambda x: indexes[x]['name']):
    pct = indexes[i]['count'] and indexes[i]['count']/clusters_sum*100 or 0
    if pct < 0.06: continue
    print >> out, '%8s  %9d  %5.1f' % (indexes[i]['name'], indexes[i]['count'], pct)
else:
    print >> out
    print >> out
    print >> out

However, I think most people would prefer seeing the second syntax.

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I had assumed the else was on the if, not the for loop. –  wobbily_col Sep 19 '12 at 14:10

for loops can have an else clause.

From http://docs.python.org/tutorial/controlflow.html#break-and-continue-statements-and-else-clauses-on-loops:

Loop statements may have an else clause; it is executed when the loop terminates through exhaustion of the list (with for) or when the condition becomes false (with while), but not when the loop is terminated by a break statement.

Since the loop doesn't contain a break statement, the else clause will always be executed.

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