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I have declared the following interface in Java:

public interface ITest {
    void doStuff();
}

which is implemented by another few classes who overwrite the doStuff() method. I then use this interface as the type in a function:

public gonnaDoSomeStuff(ITest fun) {
    fun.doStuff();
}

However, Java (and Eclipse) state that the method is undefined for type ITest. What am I doing wrong?

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3  
Are you sure that you are using this ITest and not some other interface somewhere else in your project (or your dependencies)? Are you sure that you've compiled ITest. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 18 '12 at 17:30
    
Eclipse's compilied artefacts are likely out of sync with the changes in your file. Save all files, clean and rebuild your project. –  munyengm Sep 18 '12 at 17:30
1  
What happens when you hold Ctrl and click ITest in Eclipse? Does it jump to that ITest class? What happens when you ctrl-click doStuff()? –  Joachim Sauer Sep 18 '12 at 17:34
1  
If you click on the ITest parameter whilst holding down the shift button does eclipse navigate to the ITest interface you expect it to? –  munyengm Sep 18 '12 at 17:36
1  
Joachim / munyengm: you were both correct. I must have hit quick fix and Eclipse applied a generic of the name <ITest> to my class. It wasn't actually referencing the interface. Thank you! –  sdasdadas Sep 18 '12 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turns out that the class containing my gonnaDoSomeStuff method was appended with a generic, which was being referenced instead of the actual interface.

Wrong

public class Dog<ITest> {
    public gonnaDoSomeStuff(ITest fun) {
        // ...
    }
}

Right

public class Dog {
    public gonnaDoSomeStuff(ITest fun) {
        // ...
    }
}
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You can not access default declared method in a public class because its scope is limited. You should declared it as public for call in public class.

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This is a good point - but because my subclasses were in the same package this actually didn't pose a problem. But I should have declared it protected for my use-case. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/215497/… –  sdasdadas Sep 18 '12 at 17:49
3  
-1 interface methods are always public in Java. Furthermore JLS states that it is highly discouraged to redundantly specify public modifier in interfaces. –  Fabian Barney Sep 18 '12 at 17:54
    
Am I missing something or is every method declared in an interface public? –  svz Sep 18 '12 at 17:54
    
Every method is Public. This can change with the addition of static classes. –  Mitch Connor Sep 18 '12 at 21:12

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