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Very new SQL Server, am using SQL server 2008. I have two tables, Table A and Table B

I want to update Table A with the count of a matching strings of Table B. Here is what I came up by declaring a static varchar. I would like it to do it in a procedure for all Records in Table A anytime a record is inserted/updated in Table B.

TABLE A: **PO**, Count, Closed         Table B: **LD**
            24A, 0,     0,                      24A-1
            25A, 0,     0,                      24A-2
            26A, 0,     0,                      25A-3
                                                26A-1
                                                26A-2

Code I tried:

 Declare @POTableA AS VARCHAR(15)
 SET @POTableA = '24A'
   Update TABLE A
   SET TableA.Count =(Select Count(*) AS 'Count_LD' FROM TABLE B 
   WHERE TableB.LD LIKE '%'+@POTableA+'-%') 
   FROM TABLE B WHERE TABLEA.PO LIKE '%'+@POTableA+'%'

Current result:

TABLE A: **PO**, Count, Closed         Table B: **LD**
            24A, 2,     0,                      24A-1
            25A, 0,     0,                      24A-2
            26A, 0,     0,                      25A-3
                                                26A-1
                                                26A-2

Desired result:

TABLE A: **PO**, Count, Closed         Table B: **LD**
            24A, 2,     0,                      24A-1
            25A, 1,     0,                      24A-2
            26A, 2,     0,                      25A-3
                                                26A-1
                                                26A-2
share|improve this question
    
Because i need to update PO to close it once maximum LD's is reached. A person is able to create as any unique LD's if PO is not closed. Thanks. – Ed Gar Sep 18 '12 at 17:50
    
You can still enforce that without storing the count somewhere. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 18 '12 at 17:52
    
"While I'm not sure why you need to keep the count stored in table A - you can always determine this count at runtime" – Ed Gar Sep 18 '12 at 17:55
    
How can this be done without declaring values. I would like to select from table A any PO not closed and get the count in B that match part of the string. Then update A with count? – Ed Gar Sep 18 '12 at 17:58
    
It's the "update A with count" that I don't get (but which my answer solves - did you try it?). If you need to validate that a PO is not closed at the time you are trying to add a new LD to table B, can't you just check the count using a join? Why does the count have to be stored independently when you can get that information from data that already exists? – Aaron Bertrand Sep 18 '12 at 17:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

While I'm not sure why you need to keep the count stored in table A - you can always determine this count at runtime, then you don't have to use triggers etc. to maintain that information (which is redundant). But here is a demonstration using table variables about how such an update with an aggregate could be achieved (there are other ways, likely).

DECLARE @A TABLE(PO VARCHAR(32), [count] INT);

DECLARE @B TABLE(LD VARCHAR(32));

INSERT @A VALUES
('24A',0), ('25A',0), ('26A',0);

INSERT @B VALUES
('24A-1'), ('24A-2'), ('25A-3'),
('26A-1'), ('26A-2');

UPDATE T
SET T.[count] = S.[count]
FROM @A AS T
INNER JOIN
(
 SELECT A.PO, [count] = COUNT(B.LD)
   FROM @A AS A INNER JOIN @B AS B
   ON B.LD LIKE A.PO + '%'
   GROUP BY A.PO
) AS S
ON T.PO = S.PO;

SELECT PO, [count] FROM @A;

Results:

PO     count
----   -----
24A    2
25A    1
26A    2

Now if you need to do this in a trigger, it would be something like:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.MaintainRedundantCount
ON dbo.TableB
FOR INSERT, UPDATE
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  UPDATE T
   SET T.[count] = S.[count]
   FROM dbo.TableA AS T
   INNER JOIN
   (
     SELECT A.PO, [count] = COUNT(B.LD)
       FROM dbo.TableA AS A 
       INNER JOIN dbo.TableB AS B
       ON B.LD LIKE A.PO + '%'
       GROUP BY A.PO
   ) AS S
   ON T.PO = S.PO;
END
GO

You might want to modify one of those lines to:

       ON B.LD LIKE A.PO + '-%'

But since you only gave three sample values in the question, and they were all the exact same format, it's tough to tell what your true data set looks like.

share|improve this answer
    
I dumb question, what is the Update "T set T.[count] = S.[count]" as well as the "Join inserted AS B", am not too clear on the syntax and getting errors. Thanks. – Ed Gar Sep 18 '12 at 21:03
    
@user1680975 What errors? Hard to answer if we don't know what portion you've typed and what errors you are getting. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 18 '12 at 21:04
    
Msg 2 Level 15 , Incorrect Syntax near '.' By T do you mean Table A? – Ed Gar Sep 18 '12 at 21:08
    
I still can't see what you have in your query window that causes that error. I don't think it's exactly what I have above. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 18 '12 at 21:09
    
When setting up the UPDATE I seem to misunderstood where you set T = what? I have Table A and Table B – Ed Gar Sep 18 '12 at 21:10

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