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In the current project we are using TeamCity as a CI platform and we have a bunch of projects and builds up and running.

The next step in our process is to track some statistics around our tests. So we are looking for a tool that could help us to get this numbers and make them visible for each build.

In the first place we want to keep track of the following numbers:

  • Number of unit tests
  • Number of specflow tests tagged as @ui
  • Number of specflow tests tagged as @controller
  • And also time spent running each of the test categories above.

Some details about the current scenario:

  • .net projects
  • nUnit for the unit tests
  • SpecFlow for functional tests categorized as @controller and @ui
  • rake for the build scripts
  • TeamCity as a CI Server.

I'm looking for tools and/or practices suggestions to help us to track those numbers.

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TeamCity has code coverage builtin, and can answer some of your questions: jetbrains.com/teamcity/features/code_quality.html –  Arran Sep 18 '12 at 18:31

1 Answer 1

The issue here is your requirements for tags. SpecFlow/NUnit/TeamCity/DotCover integration is already developed enough to do everything that you require, except for the tagging.

I'm wondering how much of a mix you expect to have between UI and Controller tests. Assuming that you are correctly seperating your domains (see Dan North - Whose domain is it anyway) then you should never get scenarios tagged with these two tags in the same feature. So then I assume its just a case of separating the UI features from the functionality (controller) features.

I've recently started separating my features in just this way, by adding Namespace folders in my tests assembly, mirroring how you would separate Models, ViewModels and Views (etc), and TeamCity is definitely clever enough to report coverage and each stage of the drill down through assemblies and namespaces.

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