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example:

var arr = ["one","two","three"];

arr.forEach(function(part){
  part = "four";
  return "four";
})

alert(arr);

The array is still with it's original values, is there any way to have writing access to array's elements from iterating function ?

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5 Answers

The callback is passed the element, the index, and the array itself.

arr.forEach(function(part, index, theArray) {
  theArray[index] = "hello world";
});
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1  
Surely that should be: arr.forEach(function(part, index, theArray) { ... }); –  beeglebug Jul 8 '13 at 21:40
    
@beeglebug ha ha wow, yes it should be :) –  Pointy Jul 8 '13 at 22:18
    
I read somewhere once that .forEach()'s callback only had one argument - the element - and that that was done to simplify blah blah blah. I am overjoyed to discover that that is not the case! –  sean.boyer Feb 26 at 23:20
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Javascript is pass by value, and which essentially means part is a copy of the value in the array.

To change the value, access the array itself in your loop.

arr[index] = 'new value';

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It depends on the type of part whether it is copied - although you are right that the variable is not a pointer, but a value –  Bergi Sep 18 '12 at 18:42
2  
Saying "JavaScript is pass by value" is a gross generalization. There are reference types in JavaScript. Value types are passed by value. –  Alex Turpin Sep 18 '12 at 18:43
1  
Not a gross generalization. A completely correct and absolute statement. Javascript passes references by value. Javascript is pass by value, always. –  hvgotcodes Sep 18 '12 at 18:48
1  
@Xeon06 stackoverflow.com/a/518069/305644 –  hvgotcodes Sep 19 '12 at 0:39
1  
@Bergi just because a language has a thing called a reference, doesn't mean it uses pass by reference. References can be (and are) passed by value, i.e. the value of the reference is copied and that copy is used as the argument. –  hvgotcodes Sep 19 '12 at 15:06
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replace it with index of the array.

array[index] = new_value;
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Yes, you can. Please see this example I threw together for you:

<html><head><script type="text/javascript">

// Define the callback function.
function ShowResults(value, index, ar) {
    document.write("value: " + value);
    document.write(" index: " + index);
    document.write("<br />");
}

function ChangeArray(value, index, ar) {
    switch(value)
    {
    case "a":
      arr[index] = "d";
      break;
    case "b":
      arr[index] = "e";
      break;
    case "c":
      arr[index] = "f";
      break;
    default:
      break;
    }
}

// Create an array.
var arr = ['a', 'b', 'c'];

arr.forEach(ShowResults);

document.write("<hr />");

arr.forEach(ChangeArray);

document.write("<hr />");

arr.forEach(ShowResults);

</script></head>
<body></body></html>
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The .forEach function can have a callback function(eachelement, elementIndex) So basically what you need to do is :

arr.forEach(function(element,index){
    arr[index] = "four";   //set the value  
});
console.log(arr); //the array has been overwritten.

Or if you want to keep the original array, you can make a copy of it before doing the above process. To make a copy, you can use:

var copy = arr.slice();
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