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I want to know the size occupied by a JavaScript object.

Take the following function -

function Marks()
{
  this.maxMarks = 100;
}

function Student()
{
  this.firstName = "firstName";
  this.lastName = "lastName";
  this.marks = new Marks();
}

Now.. i instantiate the student

var stud = new Student();

so that I can do stuff like

stud.firstName = "new Firstname";

alert(stud.firstName);

stud.marks.maxMarks = 200;

etc...

now, stud object will occupy some size in memory. It has some data and more objects.

How do I find out how much memory the stud object occupies?

something like a sizeof() in JavaScript?

It would be really awesome if i could find it out in a single function call like

sizeof(stud)

P.S. I've been searching the Internet for months - couldn't find it (asked in a couple of forums - no replies).

share|improve this question
23  
He said Javascript, not Java. –  Sinan Taifour Aug 8 '09 at 8:05
2  
There are (will arise) lots of reasons why I need to find the size of an object in JavaScript. I am new to JavaScript so I don't follow the best practices. I am still learning them. I have developed a firefox extension which I'm sure is using more memory than it should. I am working on some ways to (hopefully) reduce memory usage.. im talking about thousands of instances many objects per tab, so memory does matter! The thing is, i want to know if my memory reduction efforts actually help in reducing memory.. and by how much. –  anonymous Aug 8 '09 at 8:25
1  
Higher level language than JS? what would that be in this case? –  anonymous Aug 8 '09 at 10:34
3  
It's not the size that matters anyway. It's how you use it. PS: What a stud! –  Thomas Eding Nov 4 '11 at 20:07
1  
@SpencerRuport Number one reason for knowing object size would be for html5 offline capable applications where you have sometimes limited storage space ( 5-10Mb can be eaten up quickly for a data intensive application ). –  David Dec 28 '11 at 18:36
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13 Answers

I have re-factored the code in my original answer. I have removed the recursion and removed the assumed existence overhead.

function roughSizeOfObject( object ) {

    var objectList = [];
    var stack = [ object ];
    var bytes = 0;

    while ( stack.length ) {
        var value = stack.pop();

        if ( typeof value === 'boolean' ) {
            bytes += 4;
        }
        else if ( typeof value === 'string' ) {
            bytes += value.length * 2;
        }
        else if ( typeof value === 'number' ) {
            bytes += 8;
        }
        else if
        (
            typeof value === 'object'
            && objectList.indexOf( value ) === -1
        )
        {
            objectList.push( value );

            for( var i in value ) {
                stack.push( value[ i ] );
            }
        }
    }
    return bytes;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
you may want to think of the object keys as well –  zupa Jan 24 '13 at 16:28
1  
Anyone who landed here looking for the smallest type for the purposes of false/true, it seems to be undefined/null. –  zupa Jan 24 '13 at 16:32
    
"よんもじ".length is 4 in Javascript, but are you sure it's 8 bytes, as your code returns it? –  syockit Jul 17 '13 at 13:46
3  
Yep. Characters in JavaScript are stored according to ECMA-262 3rd Edition Specification - bclary.com/2004/11/07/#a-4.3.16 –  tomwrong Jul 17 '13 at 14:16
    
This returns 0 for circular objects. Is that intended? –  blob8108 Mar 11 at 22:30
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I just wrote this to solve a similar (ish) problem. It doesn't exactly do what you may be looking for, ie it doesn't take into account how the interpreter stores the object.

But, if you are using V8, it should give you a fairly ok approximation as the awesome prototyping and hidden classes lick up most of the overhead.

function roughSizeOfObject( object ) {

    var objectList = [];

    var recurse = function( value )
    {
        var bytes = 0;

        if ( typeof value === 'boolean' ) {
            bytes = 4;
        }
        else if ( typeof value === 'string' ) {
            bytes = value.length * 2;
        }
        else if ( typeof value === 'number' ) {
            bytes = 8;
        }
        else if
        (
            typeof value === 'object'
            && objectList.indexOf( value ) === -1
        )
        {
            objectList[ objectList.length ] = value;

            for( i in value ) {
                bytes+= 8; // an assumed existence overhead
                bytes+= recurse( value[i] )
            }
        }

        return bytes;
    }

    return recurse( object );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Woot! My first up vote!!! ta –  tomwrong Jun 15 '11 at 17:25
    
@Liangliang Zheng - great point re infinite loop, thanks. Hope you don't mind if I re-gig it a bit and update mine after work (?) –  tomwrong Jun 16 '11 at 11:13
    
I'm going to bench test this tonight with node.js and get some better coefficients in place. –  tomwrong Jun 16 '11 at 11:57
    
oh, thanks again Liangliang Zheng for your input. –  tomwrong Jun 16 '11 at 11:58
    
The 'bytes+= recurse( value[i] )' line, throws an error in my FF 14.01: NS_ERROR_FAILURE: Component returned failure code: 0x80004005 (NS_ERROR_FAILURE) [nsIDOMHTMLInputElement.selectionStart]. On one of my Object, if I try a different one, it doesn't, maybe a browser bug, or the code doesn't work for every object (the one that doesn't works contains functions, the one that work doesn't) –  TrySpace Aug 9 '12 at 8:22
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The Google Chrome Heap Profiler allows you to inspect object memory use.

You need to be able to locate the object in the trace which can be tricky. If you pin the object to the Window global, it is pretty easy to find from the "Containment" listing mode.

In the attached screenshot, I created an object called "testObj" on the window. I then located in the profiler (after making a recording) and it shows the full size of the object and everything in it under "retained size".

More details on the memory breakdowns here - https://developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/memory-analysis-101#object_sizes

Chrome profiler

In the above screenshot, the object shows a retained size of 60. I believe the unit is bytes here.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer solved my problem along with : developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/… . Quick tip : take a quick Heap Snapshot, run the task you suspect is leaking, take a new quick Heap Snapshot and select the comparison view at the bottom. It makes obvious what objects were created between the two snapshots. –  Johnride Mar 28 at 15:13
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This is a hacky method, but i tried it twice with different numbers and it seems to be consistent.

What you can do is to try and allocate a huge number of objects, like one or two million objects of the kind you want. Put the objects in an array to prevent the garbage collector from releasing them (note that this will add a slight memory overhead because of the array, but i hope this shouldn't matter and besides if you are going to worry about objects being in memory, you store them somewhere). Add an alert before and after the allocation and in each alert check how much memory the Firefox process is taking. Before you open the page with the test, make sure you have a fresh Firefox instance. Open the page, note the memory usage after the "before" alert is shown. Close the alert, wait for the memory to be allocated. Subtract the new memory from the older and divide it by the amount of allocations. Example:

function Marks()
{
  this.maxMarks = 100;
}

function Student()
{
  this.firstName = "firstName";
  this.lastName = "lastName";
  this.marks = new Marks();
}

var manyObjects = new Array();
alert('before');
for (var i=0; i<2000000; i++)
    manyObjects[i] = new Student();
alert('after');

I tried this in my computer and the process had 48352K of memory when the "before" alert was shown. After the allocation, Firefox had 440236K of memory. For 2million allocations, this is about 200 bytes for each object.

I tried it again with 1million allocations and the result was similar: 196 bytes per object (i suppose the extra data in 2mill was used for Array).

So, here is a hacky method that might help you. JavaScript doesn't provide a "sizeof" method for a reason: each JavaScript implementaion is different. In Google Chrome for example the same page uses about 66 bytes for each object (judging from the task manager at least).

share|improve this answer
    
Hey.. thanks for the technique. I was having that as plan B incase no direct way was there to measure memory usage. –  anonymous Aug 8 '09 at 10:38
1  
Each C and C++ implementation is also different. ;) The size of a data type in C or C++ is implementation specific. I see no reason JavaScript couldn't support such an operator, though it wouldn't serve the same purpose or have the same meaning as it does in C or C++ (which are lower-level languages and measure the actual size of a fixed-size data type at compile time as opposed to the variable-size of a dynamic JavaScript object at run-time). –  bamccaig Oct 21 '09 at 17:48
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Sorry I could not comment, so I just continue the work from tomwrong. This enhanced version will not count object more than once, thus no infinite loop. Plus, I reckon the key of an object should be also counted, roughly.

function roughSizeOfObject( value, level ) {
    if(level == undefined) level = 0;
    var bytes = 0;

    if ( typeof value === 'boolean' ) {
        bytes = 4;
    }
    else if ( typeof value === 'string' ) {
        bytes = value.length * 2;
    }
    else if ( typeof value === 'number' ) {
        bytes = 8;
    }
    else if ( typeof value === 'object' ) {
        if(value['__visited__']) return 0;
        value['__visited__'] = 1;
        for( i in value ) {
            bytes += i.length * 2;
            bytes+= 8; // an assumed existence overhead
            bytes+= roughSizeOfObject( value[i], 1 )
        }
    }

    if(level == 0){
        clear__visited__(value);
    }
    return bytes;
}

function clear__visited__(value){
    if(typeof value == 'object'){
        delete value['__visited__'];
        for(var i in value){
            clear__visited__(value[i]);
        }
    }
}

roughSizeOfObject(a);
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is more accurate as it's counting keys, although it does count the '__visited__' key –  Sam Hasler Mar 5 '13 at 16:34
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To the best of my knowledge JavaScript simply doesn't have anything that can help you here. the language is designed for a world where memory is freely available and the program will be lightweight. Measuring memory would both be beyond it's requirements and not necessary for almost anything you would care to write.

I imagine that the duck-typed nature of JS and the fact that it's highly implementation dependant would be a problem for determining memory consumption with your own language extensions. Almost everything I've ever seen used to benchmark JS memory leaks simply inspects the task manager. The most accurate solution I can think of if you really really had to know would be to get into the code of an OSS browser like firefox and create a plugin which watches this and reports it, and I very much doubt that would be worthwhile.

Summary: you can't and it's not worth knowing.

share|improve this answer
23  
"you can't".. okay.. "not worth knowing".. i don't agree. I am sure my javascript code is taking up more memory - creating more objects unnecessarily. The difference in Firefox's memory usage - with and without my extension is something like 300MB+! If I am going to take steps to reduce mem comsumption, it DOES MATTER and it IS WORTH KNOWING how much memory my objects take up. –  anonymous Aug 8 '09 at 8:27
    
The amount of memory your JS is consuming is a fractional drop in the ocean compared to what the browser, pretty much unless you're writing code designed to strain the memory. You literally have to create and keep hundreds of thousands if not millions of objects in memory before you'll start creating a problem. –  annakata Aug 8 '09 at 8:37
6  
you must be kidding me, that the amount of memory JS is consuming is a fractional drop in the ocean. It is a very worthwhile investigation to reduce memory utilization so javascript apps can work on lower powered devices such as smartphones. –  dubRun Nov 9 '11 at 20:13
3  
Welcome to 2013, just 4 years later I've seen pages leaking memory into gigabytes. This is exactly the reason why "not worth knowing" always turns to be wrong. –  durilka Dec 5 '13 at 15:10
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If your main concern is the memory usage of your Firefox extension, I suggest checking with Mozilla developers.

Mozilla provides on its wiki a list of tools to analyze memory leaks.

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Chrome developer tools has this functionality. I found this article very helpful and does exactly what you want: https://developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/heap-profiling

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function sizeOf(parent_data, size)
{
    for (var prop in parent_data)
    {
        let value = parent_data[prop];

        if (typeof value === 'boolean')
        {
            size += 4;
        }
        else if (typeof value === 'string')
        {
            size += value.length * 2;
        }
        else if (typeof value === 'number')
        {
             size += 8;
        }
        else
        {      
            let oldSize = size;
            size += sizeOf(value, oldSize) - oldSize;
        }
    }

    return size;
}


function roughSizeOfObject(object)
{   
    let size = 0;
    for each (let prop in object)
    {    
        size += sizeOf(prop, 0);
    } // for..
    return size;
}
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Many thanks to everyone that has been working on code for this!

I just wanted to add that I've been looking for exactly the same thing, but in my case it's for managing a cache of processed objects to avoid having to re-parse and process objects from ajax calls that may or may not have been cached by the browser. This is especially useful for objects that require a lot of processing, usually anything that isn't in JSON format, but it can get very costly to keep these things cached in a large project or an app/extension that is left running for a long time.

Anyway, I use it for something something like:

var myCache = {
    cache: {},
    order: [],
    size: 0,
    maxSize: 2 * 1024 * 1024, // 2mb

    add: function(key, object) {
        // Otherwise add new object
        var size = this.getObjectSize(object);
        if (size > this.maxSize) return; // Can't store this object

        var total = this.size + size;

        // Check for existing entry, as replacing it will free up space
        if (typeof(this.cache[key]) !== 'undefined') {
            for (var i = 0; i < this.order.length; ++i) {
                var entry = this.order[i];
                if (entry.key === key) {
                    total -= entry.size;
                    this.order.splice(i, 1);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        while (total > this.maxSize) {
            var entry = this.order.shift();
            delete this.cache[entry.key];
            total -= entry.size;
        }

        this.cache[key] = object;
        this.order.push({ size: size, key: key });
        this.size = total;
    },

    get: function(key) {
        var value = this.cache[key];
        if (typeof(value) !== 'undefined') { // Return this key for longer
            for (var i = 0; i < this.order.length; ++i) {
                var entry = this.order[i];
                if (entry.key === key) {
                    this.order.splice(i, 1);
                    this.order.push(entry);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        return value;
    },

    getObjectSize: function(object) {
        // Code from above estimating functions
    },
};

It's a simplistic example and may have some errors, but it gives the idea, as you can use it to hold onto static objects (contents won't change) with some degree of intelligence. This can significantly cut down on any expensive processing requirements that the object had to be produced in the first place.

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i want to know if my memory reduction efforts actually help in reducing memory

Following up on this comment, here's what you should do: Try to produce a memory problem - Write code that creates all these objects and graudally increase the upper limit until you ran into a problem (Browser crash, Browser freeze or an Out-Of-memory error). Ideally you should repeat this experiment with different browsers and different operating system.

Now there are two options: option 1 - You didn't succeed in producing the memory problem. Hence, you are worrying for nothing. You don't have a memory issue and your program is fine.

option 2- you did get a memory problem. Now ask yourself whether the limit at which the problem occurred is reasonable (in other words: is it likely that this amount of objects will be created at normal use of your code). If the answer is 'No' then you're fine. Otherwise you now know how many objects your code can create. Rework the algorithm such that it does not breach this limit.

share|improve this answer
    
From a memory stand point, my extension adds a number of objects for each page/tab that is open in Firefox. The "number" is proportional to the size of the page. Assuming that "power" users have anywhere between 15 - 20 tabs open, and if the web page has a lot of contents, the browser becomes slow and frustratingly non-responsive after some time. This happens even without me explicitly trying to stress the app. I have plans to rewrite the code that I think will reduce a lot of object creation. I just wanted to be sure that the no. of objects reduced amounted to something so that it is worth it –  anonymous Aug 8 '09 at 10:37
    
@Senthil: but object size has no meaning unless you know amount of available memory. Since amount of memory is likely to remain a mystery, speaking in terms of #objects is just as useful as speaking in term of #bytes –  Itay Maman Aug 8 '09 at 14:08
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I use Chrome dev tools' Timeline tab, instantiate increasingly large amounts of objects, and get good estimates like that. You can use html like this one below, as boilerplate, and modify it to better simulate the characteristics of your objects (number and types of properties, etc...). You may want to click the trash bit icon at the bottom of that dev tools tab, before and after a run.

<html>
<script>
var size = 1000*100
window.onload = function() {
  document.getElementById("quantifier").value = size
}

function scaffold()
{
  console.log("processing Scaffold...");
  a = new Array
}

function start()
{
  size = document.getElementById("quantifier").value
  console.log("Starting... quantifier is " + size);
  console.log("starting test")
  for (i=0; i<size; i++){
    a[i]={"some" : "thing"}
  }
  console.log("done...")
}

function tearDown()
{
  console.log("processing teardown");
  a.length=0
}

</script>
<body>
    <span style="color:green;">Quantifier:</span>
    <input id="quantifier" style="color:green;" type="text"></input>
    <button onclick="scaffold()">Scaffold</button>
    <button onclick="start()">Start</button>
    <button onclick="tearDown()">Clean</button>
    <br/>
</body>
</html>

Instantiating 2 million objects of just one property each (as in this code above) leads to a rough calculation of 50 bytes per object, on my Chromium, right now. Changing the code to create a random string per object adds some 30 bytes per object, etc. Hope this helps.

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I believe you forgot to include 'array'.

  typeOf : function(value) {
        var s = typeof value;
        if (s === 'object')
        {
            if (value)
            {
                if (typeof value.length === 'number' && !(value.propertyIsEnumerable('length')) && typeof value.splice === 'function')
                {
                    s = 'array';
                }
            }
            else
            {
                s = 'null';
            }
        }
        return s;
    },

   estimateSizeOfObject: function(value, level)
    {
        if(undefined === level)
            level = 0;

        var bytes = 0;

        if ('boolean' === typeOf(value))
            bytes = 4;
        else if ('string' === typeOf(value))
            bytes = value.length * 2;
        else if ('number' === typeOf(value))
            bytes = 8;
        else if ('object' === typeOf(value) || 'array' === typeOf(value))
        {
            for(var i in value)
            {
                bytes += i.length * 2;
                bytes+= 8; // an assumed existence overhead
                bytes+= estimateSizeOfObject(value[i], 1)
            }
        }
        return bytes;
    },

   formatByteSize : function(bytes)
    {
        if (bytes < 1024)
            return bytes + " bytes";
        else
        {
            var floatNum = bytes/1024;
            return floatNum.toFixed(2) + " kb";
        }
    },
share|improve this answer
    
In JS, an array is an object. There may be some optimizations in implementations, but conceptually arrays and objects are the same. –  Kris Walker Nov 20 '11 at 10:15
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