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I tried to write some functions to calculate anova power and sample size using non-central parameter.

There're some very good functions in R but my functions were to learn and reproduce line of thought from a biostatistical book...

Despite de math involved, my "nc" and "fpower" functions just work well, and as expected:

nc <- function(diff,n,sd) {
  nonc <- (diff^2/2)*(n/sd^2)
  return(nonc)
}

fpower <- function(k,n,diff,sd,alpha=0.05) {
  nonc <- nc(diff,n,sd)
  dfn <- k - 1
  dfd <- k*(n-1)
  f1 <- qf(1-alpha,dfn,dfd)
  f2 <- pf(f1,dfn,dfd,nonc)
  return(1-f2)
}

However, my "fsample" just doesn´t work as expected. Return 2, the first n in the seq.

fsample <- function(k,diff,sd,alpha=0.05,power=0.9){
  for(n in 2:5000){
    if ( fpower(k,n,sd,alpha) >= power) break
  }
  return(n)
}

But, if I "hand" run this code in console it work as expected!! And return the right n value.

What's wrong?

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1 Answer 1

You didn't pass the diff argument to fpower, so the arguments aren't in the order you think they are. fsample should be:

fsample <- function(k,diff,sd,alpha=0.05,power=0.9){
  for(n in 2:5000){
    if ( fpower(k,n,diff,sd,alpha) >= power) break
  }
  return(n)
}

Note that this wouldn't have been a problem if you had named the arguments when you called fpower because you would have received an error about diff being missing and not having a default value:

# this will error
fsample <- function(k,diff,sd,alpha=0.05,power=0.9){
  for(n in 2:5000){
    if ( fpower(k=k,n=n,sd=sd,alpha=alpha) >= power) break
  }
  return(n)
}

Also, you might want to avoid giving data objects the same name as functions (e.g. diff, sd, and power are also functions), otherwise you may confuse yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
To clarify, assuming I read this right, when executing these functions in the console, diff is in the local environment so fpower can find it despite not being passed as an argument. –  Carl Witthoft Sep 19 '12 at 1:30
    
Thanks a lot... now just work fine... :) –  Sérgio Paulo Sep 19 '12 at 12:05

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