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I am a bit confused about what "task period" exactly means

For example, assume that there is a task,

Task(){

while(1) 
  { 
    //do something
    //sleep 6 time units
  }

}

Assume it is released at time 0 and it's total execution time is 4 time units ("do something" part) and deadline for this execution is time 7

Suppose that this task is not preempted during its execution cycle, hence for this time, its period will be 4 + 6 = 10, so next time it will be released at time 10, so T = 10

Now suppose that this task is preempted by another one at time 3, and then comes back at time 5, so it has enough time (until time 7) to execute remaining part (1 time unit)

So it finishes at time 6, and hence for this time, its period will be 6 + 6 = 12, so next time it will be released at time 12, so T = 12

What is task period then ? In RM scheduling, task priorities are assigned based on task periods, so which values for task periods are considered then ??

On schedule charts, periodic tasks are always shown as having some fixed period, for example, period is 5, if task should be released at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, etc, so if released at 0, it should finish until 5, and so on
What if it finishes at 2, how can i guarantee that next release is at 5 ?
Or assume that it is released at 15, and executes between 16 and 18, how can i guarantee that next release is at 20 ?
Well, in this example, clearly, the deadline is defined by this so-called "task period" i.e. is multiple of 5, because the task cannot finish later than its next intended release, and task period is defined by required release times, but i don't understand how these release times are kept as multiples of 5

As we see in the example at the beginning, next release of the same task may be different, depending on the situation (10 and 12) but it doesn't matter as far as the execution finishes until time 7

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1 Answer

RM is a static priority scheduling algorithm that assigns each task a priority inversely proportional to its period, i.e, the smaller the period, the higher the priority. ... in Minimum and Maximum Utilization Bounds for Multiprocessor Rate Monotonic Scheduling. [Jose M. L´opez, et. al. 2003]

A must read for questions related to rm scheduling.

Another resource: ...Real-Time Scheduling Algorithms... [Ed Overton et. al. 1997]

So your idea above is about creating a so called soft deadline aperiodic task. A few modification are to be added to achieve this:

Task(){

  while(1) 
  { 
    capture_time(start_time)
    //do something
    capture_time(end_time)
    //sleep 6 time units
    // rather than sleeping a fixed time: Sleep the remaining 
    // time until the tasks deadline
    Sleep(desired_period + start_time - end_time) 
  }

}
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okay, so your implementation creates periodic task, and this matches well with schedule chart; but usually that is not the way how a real-time task is implemented. let's take uCos for example, actually i've never seen tricks like that (with sleep and capture functions) in its task implementations - usually tasks are in format that i've mentioned at the start; so you mean that, in all those cases the implemented tasks are aperiodic ? how can we apply RM then ? RM works for periodic tasks only –  mangusta Sep 19 '12 at 10:23
    
actually all real-time priority assignment schemes i've seen so far, are intended for periodic tasks; what about aperiodic tasks ? how priorities are assigned in that case ? app-specific ? –  mangusta Sep 19 '12 at 10:27
    
I only added the virtual function capture... here to show how a task can be made periodic with a fixed period. The intention was to make the situation more clear. However, in practice the scheduler has to monitor the task periods and assign the priorities accordingly. –  Arno Sep 19 '12 at 10:44
    
you mean that scheduler measures task period by itself ?? but actually in practice, task priorities are given to scheduler in advance, by developer; these priorities might be based on RM in case of periodic tasks, or any other scheme in case of aperiodic tasks. another story is dynamic-priority schedulers, which assign priorities dynamically, but they're not used that much in rtos. anyway thanks for reply –  mangusta Sep 19 '12 at 12:04
    
Well, just to get things right: RM static priority scheduling needs to know the task priority in advance. Thus the task time must be known in advance. But it also needs to be known that the sum of all tasks is not going beyond the systems capability. The latter is the major problem. See Lopez. –  Arno Sep 19 '12 at 12:41
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