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I have the classes

Interface IVehicle
{
    int numberOfWheels;
    bool CanCross(string obstacle);
    // etc
}

class Car : IVehicle
{
    public int numberOfWheels = 4;
    public bool CanCross(string obstacle)
    {
       switch(obstacle) 
       {
          case "river":
              return false;
          case "grass":
              return true;
          // etc
       }
    }
}

class RaceCar: Car
{
    public int numberOfWheels = 4;
    public bool CanCross(string obstacle)
    {
       switch(obstacle) 
       {
          case "river":
              return false;
          case "grass":
              return false;
          // etc
       }
    }
}

And then I have the method:

 public object Foo(IVehicle vehicle, string obstacle)
 {                              
      if(vehicle.CanCross(obstacle)==false)
      {
          if(vehicle is Car)
             return Foo(new RaceCar(), obstacle);
          else if(vehicle is RaceCar)
             return Foo(new OldCar(), obstacle);
         // etc
          else
             return null;
      }

      // implementation

      return someObject;
 }

note that if the vehicle cannot cross the obstacle I recursively call the same method again in order to try with a different vehicle. My question is why if vehicle = SpeedCar then if (vehicle is Car) evaluates to true ? Probably because it inherits from it. How could I check if the vehicle is a SpeedCar but not a Car. I now I could call the ToString() method then do a regex but then if I rename my classes I will break my code...

In other words if the vehicle that I pass cannot cross and it happens to be a Car or SpeedCar I will go into an infinite loop...

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How could I check if the vehicle is a SpeedCar but not a Car

vehicle.GetType() == typeof(SpeedCar)
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worked great thanks!!!! –  Tono Nam Sep 18 '12 at 19:09
1  
@TonoNam: you're welcome. By the way, you really shouldn't hide inherited member CanCross. Make it virtual and use override keyword to override behavior in descendant classes. Also, to throw away ugly type checking, you can add a virtual property Car.ReplaceWithCar. –  Dennis Sep 18 '12 at 19:13
    
Then your method Foo will look like this: if (!car.CanCross(obstacle)) { return car.ReplaceWithCar != null ? Foo(car.ReplaceWithCar) : null; } –  Dennis Sep 18 '12 at 19:19
    
Thanks I will make it virtual or abstract. –  Tono Nam Sep 18 '12 at 21:14
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You can do this using the is operator - in fact, it's somewhat faster than using GetType().

Your inheritance hierarchy is IVehicle->Car->RaceCar, so anything that's a RaceCar will also be a Car and an IVehicle. If you first test for the base class, your code will never reach more specific test because the base class will match anyway - this is why you had problems with it.

The right way to test in a scenario where you need to do different things for classes in an inheritance chain is to test more specific (more derived) classes first and test base classes last.

if (vehicle is RaceCar)
{
    // code
}
else if (vehicle is Car)
{
    // code
}
else
{
    // code
}

Dennis' answer is correct that using virtual functions simplifies these situations because you can avoid these kind of tests in most cases when you have virtual functions - simply all derived classes can provide their own implementation of a function (or rely on the base implementation without overriding it when appropriate). If there's no point in having a base implementation you can use the abstract keyword to indicate that derived classes must provide an implementation without relying on the base class. Those derived classes then use override to implement such abstract functions.

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While others have answered your question already, I would like to suggest you another way for generating Foos. A way to completely get rid of the endless if-else chain, would be to let the vehicles implement a method CreateAlternateVehicle

public interface IVehicle
{
    bool CanCross(string obstacle);

    IVehicle CreateAlternateVehicle();
}

A Car would create a RaceCar, a RaceCar an OldCar and so on. The last car in the chain could return null. Then your Foo creation becomes

public object Foo(IVehicle vehicle, string obstacle)
{                              
    if(!vehicle.CanCross(obstacle)) {
        var altVehicle = vehicle.CreateAlternateVehicle();
        if (altVehicle == null) {
            return null;
        }
        return Foo(altVehicle, obstacle);
    }
    ...
}

Very often if-else chains and switch statements are a hint, that something could be done in a more object-oriented way.

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You should just check if(vehicle is RaceCar)

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